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Susmitha Nambuthiri, Amy Fulcher, Andrew K. Koeser, Robert Geneve, and Genhua Niu

al., 2009 ). Green industry stakeholders (i.e., nursery, greenhouse, and landscape professionals) have identified the use of plantable or compostable biodegradable container alternatives as a marketable way to improve the sustainability of current

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, James A. Schrader, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

.G. Camberato, D. 2011 Growth and development of ‘Eckespoint Classic Red’ poinsettia in biodegradable and compostable containers HortTechnology 21 419 423 McCabe, K.G. Schrader, J.A. Madbouly, S. Grewell, D. Graves, W.R. 2014 Evaluation of biopolymer

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Michael R. Evans, Matt Taylor, and Jeff Kuehny

) cultivation in biodegradable pots: Mechanical and agronomical behavior of pots and plant traits Acta Hort. 801 1563 1570 Evans, M.R. Hensley, D. 2004 Plant growth in plastic, peat and processed poultry feather fiber growing containers HortScience 39 1012 1014

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Stephanie A. Beeks and Michael R. Evans

biodegradable containers compared with plastic containers for the production of long-term crops using a subirrigation system. Materials and Methods The containers evaluated included: 15.2-cm injection-molded polypropylene plastic (Dillen Products, Middlefield

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Kenneth G. McCabe, James A. Schrader, Samy Madbouly, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

industry growers indicated that they use biodegradable plant containers, and only 4.8% use containers made from materials other than petroleum plastic. The low rates of biocontainer implementation in the green industry, coupled with increasing consumer

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, Alexander G. Litvin, James A. Schrader, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

-based plastic (control) container (655 mL volume; ITML, Middlefield, OH). Bioplastic containers represented containers classified as durable, compostable, or biodegradable in soil ( Schrader et al., 2015 ). Selections were based on both high and low ratings for

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, James A. Schrader, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

. Horticultural containers are predominately manufactured from PPs owing to their relatively low cost, strength, and availability in numerous shapes and sizes ( Evans and Hensley, 2004 ; Hall et al., 2010 ; Helgeson et al., 2009 ). Biodegradable or compostable

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Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Bert M. Cregg, Rafael Auras, Amy Fulcher, Diana R. Cochran, Genhua Niu, Youping Sun, Guihong Bi, Susmitha Nambuthiri, and Robert L. Geneve

growing containers HortScience 39 1012 1014 Hall, C.R. Campbell, B.L. Behe, B.K. Yue, C. Lopez, R.G. Dennis, J.H. 2010 The appeal of biodegradable packaging to floral consumers HortScience 45 583 591 Helgeson, M.S. Graves, W.R. Grewell, D. Srinivasan, G

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Michael R. Evans, Andrew K. Koeser, Guihong Bi, Susmitha Nambuthiri, Robert Geneve, Sarah Taylor Lovell, and J. Ryan Stewart

The greenhouse industry relies on a wide range of containers when producing commodities like flowering potted crops, perennials, annual bedding plants, and vegetable transplants. Petroleum-based plastics (plastic) are the most common materials used

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Heidi A. Kratsch, James A. Schrader, Kenneth G. McCabe, Gowrishankar Srinivasan, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

-molding or blow-molding a variety of containers made from them, they are nontoxic, and many are biodegradable ( Madbouly et al., 2014 ). Bioplastics are polymer materials made from renewable biological sources or from products of biological processes. Some of