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Timothy K. Hartz, P. R. Johnstone, E. Williams, and R.F. Smith

applicability to the California lettuce industry. Materials and Methods In 2004 and 2005, a total of 35 commercial fields of iceberg and 43 fields of romaine lettuce were sampled in the coastal production regions of central California. Fields were selected

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Catherine E. Belisle, Steven A. Sargent, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Germán V. Sandoya, and Charles A. Sims

, and loss of crispness in fresh-cut Romaine lettuce ( Manolopoulou et al., 2010 ). For subjective ratings, numerical or descriptive thresholds are set, typically using hedonic scales with ratings from 1 (extremely poor quality) to 9 (excellent quality

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Gustavo F. Kreutz, Germán V. Sandoya, Gary K. England, and Wendy Mussoline

commercial farm. Both experiments were direct seeded on 0.15-m raised beds. Plots consisted of two rows per cultivar/line and were 6.1 m long. At the four-leaf stage, seedlings were thinned to a 0.30 m in-row spacing. Additional screening of romaine lettuce

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Gioia Massa, Thomas Graham, Tim Haire, Cedric Flemming II, Gerard Newsham, and Raymond Wheeler

content and the leaf sample area, an estimate of the chlorophyll content per unit area (mg·m –2 ) was calculated. Anthocyanin levels in red romaine lettuce. Anthocyanin levels were measured in the lettuce cultivar Outredgeous based on a modified procedure

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Natalie R. Bumgarner, Mark A. Bennett, Peter P. Ling, Robert W. Mullen, and Matthew D. Kleinhenz

pelleted seeds of the two red leaf romaine lettuce cultivars, Outredgeous (Johnny's Selected Seeds, Winslow, ME) and Flagship (Shamrock Seeds, Salinas, CA) were sown in seven parallel rows at 3-inch spacing within each subplot, as recommended for baby leaf

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Guangyao Wang, Mathieu Ngouajio, Milton E. McGiffen Jr, and Chad M. Hutchinson

romaine lettuce seedlings (Head Start Nursery, Gilroy, CA) were transplanted as double rows on 1.5-m wide beds to a final density of 45,000 plant/ha on 19 Oct. 1999, 17 Oct. 2000, 11 Oct. 2001, 14 Oct. 2002, and 12 Oct. 2003. The field was irrigated by

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Timothy K. Hartz and Thomas G. Bottoms

experiments. Ten clay-coated seeds of ‘Green Towers’ romaine lettuce were sown in each pot and covered with a thin layer of sand. The pots were placed in a greenhouse in a randomized complete block experimental design with five single pot replications

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Natalie R. Bumgarner, Mark A. Bennett, Peter P. Ling, Robert W. Mullen, and Matthew D. Kleinhenz

analysis. About 1000 preweighed primed and pelleted seeds of the two red-leaf romaine lettuce cultivars, Outredgeous (Johnny's Selected Seeds, Winslow, ME) and Flagship (Shamrock Seeds, Salinas, CA), were sown on 9 Oct. 2008, 21 Mar. 2009, 10 Oct. 2009, and

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Thomas G. Bottoms, Richard F. Smith, Michael D. Cahn, and Timothy K. Hartz

) and then increased in a linear fashion until harvest. There was no significant difference between iceberg and romaine lettuce in DM accumulation [regression slopes during the rapid growth phase were not significantly different ( P = 0.51)]. There was

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Milton E. McGiffen Jr., Robert L. Green, John A. Manthey, Ben A. Faber, A. James Downer, Nicholas J. Sakovich, and Jose Aguiar

To test the usefulness of methanol treatments in enhancing yield and drought tolerance, we applied methanol with and without nutrients to a wide range of crops across California: lemon (Citrus limon L.), creeping bentgrass (Agrotis palustris Huds.), romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), corn (Zea mays L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.), and radish (Raphanus sativus L.). Environments included greenhouse and field tests in coastal, inland-valley, and desert locations. Methanol did not increase the yield or growth of any crop. In some cases, methanol caused significant injury and decreased yield.