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Maria Cantor

Poster Session 17—Ornamental Plant Breeding 2 28 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Carol D. Robacker and Sloane M. Scheiber

Poster Session 5—Ornamental Plant Breeding 1 27July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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Xinwang Wang, Deborah Dean, Phillip Wadl, Denita Hadziabdic, Brian Scheffler, Timothy Rinehart, Raul Cabrera, and Robert Trigiano

Lagerstroemia L. (crape myrtle) is an economically important woody plant genus with several deciduous flowering ornamental species. A wide range of flower colors, long flowering periods, growth habits ranging from miniature to tree sizes, and exfoliating bark characteristics provide horticulturists and nursery growers with a great deal of interest in the breeding and genetics of this genus. We report microsatellite marker development from a GT-enriched genomic library of the interspecific hybrid ‘Natchez’ (L. indica L. × L. fauriei Koehne). Twelve of 43 novel microsatellite loci were characterized on a collection of 33 Lagerstroemia cultivars and accessions. Four to eight alleles per locus (mean = 5.6 alleles) were detected. Allelic richness ranged from 3.9 to 7.2 with a mean of 5.3. The level of polymorphism detected (average gene diversity of 0.68) indicates moderately high genetic diversity within the selections of crape myrtle cultivars and accessions. The examined markers also exhibited high cross-species transferability to L. fauriei, L. limii Merr., and L. subcostata Koehne.

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Margaret R. Pooler

Ornamental flowering cherry trees (Prunus L. species) are popular landscape plants, made famous in the United States by the historic Tidal Basin cherries planted in Washington, DC, in 1912. Planted primarily for their spring bloom, flowering cherries are used as street or shade trees in commercial and residential landscapes and are also valued for their fall foliage as well as ornamental bark. Approximately 1.2 million flowering cherry trees are sold each year in the United States with an estimated total sales of $32 million (USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2010).

The U.S. National Arboretum has an

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Sandra M. Reed, Gary R. Bachman, and W. Edgar Davis

The genus Callicarpa L. (Verbenaceae J. St-Hil.) consists of ≈140 species found mainly in tropical and subtropical Asia, but with a few members native to tropical America and Africa and temperate Asia and North America (Chen and Gilbert, 1994). Commonly known as beautyberries, several species of Callicarpa are cultivated as garden plants. They are grown primarily for their ornamental fruits (drupes), which are typically violet to purple in color, ripen in early autumn, and persist for a short time after leaf drop (Dirr, 1998). Although they generally lack ornamental appeal when ripe

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Margaret R. Pooler

The genus Camellia L. (Family Theaceae Mirb., nom. cons.) contains 119 to 280 species (Chang, 1998; Ming, 2000, as referenced by Vijayan et al. 2009) that are native to China and southeastern and eastern Asia. Although the most economically important member of the genus worldwide is the tea plant (C. sinensis L.), several species (e.g., C. japonica L., C. reticulata Lindl., C. sasanqua Thunb.) are cultivated for their ornamental attributes of glossy evergreen foliage and showy winter or spring blooms. Ornamental camellias first arrived

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Margaret R. Pooler

Viburnums (Genus Viburnum L.; Family Adoxaceae E.Mey., nom. cons.) comprise a diverse genus with ≈160 species and taxa found primarily in the northern temperate regions of the Americas, Europe, and Asia [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), ARS, National Genetic Resources Program, 2010; Winkworth and Donoghue, 2005]. They are versatile shrubs that have become a mainstay of American landscapes for their showy and often fragrant spring blooms, richly colored sometimes evergreen foliage, and persistent winter fruit. Valued as a tough shrub that can tolerate various environmental stresses, over three million viburnums are sold annually in

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Lisa W. Alexander, Anthony Witcher, and Michael A. Arnold

The genus Hamamelis L. (Hamamelidaceae R. Br., the witchhazel family) is represented by about six species distributed across the temperate regions of North America and Asia (Wen and Shi, 1999; Leonard, 2006). Although as many as 15 species are reported (Wiesrma, 2017), such as Hamamelis macrophylla Pursh. and Hamamelis mexicana Standl., morphological and phylogenetic analysis support a monophyletic clade of Hamamelis with six species (Li et al., 2000). Hamamelis species are large shrubs or small trees bearing characteristically narrow, strap-like flower petals

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Sandra M. Reed and Margaret R. Pooler

Clethra alnifolia L. (family Clethraceae Klotzsch.) is an ornamental shrub that is native to the eastern United States (Wilbur and Hespenheide, 1967). While sometimes called summersweet or sweet pepperbush, it is more commonly known as clethra. Approximately 25 cultivars have been described, most of which grow 6 to 8 feet in height with an equal to wider spread, but a few compact selections are also available (Dirr, 2009). Flowering occurs in midsummer. Extremely fragrant flowers are borne on upright racemes or panicles up to 15 cm in length. Flowers may be pink or white; however,