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Carolina Font i Forcada, Gemma Reig, Christian Fontich, Ignasi Batlle, Simó Alegre, Celia M. Cantín, Iban Eduardo, Joaquim Carbó, Arsène Maillard, Laurence Maillard, and Joan Bonany

controlled tree was graded for fruit size and weight using a commercial electronic fruit grader (MAF RODA, Iberica, Spain). Total yield per tree, average fruit weight, and total number of fruits per fruit size were then calculated for each pick. Under our

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-wire cucumber system that reduced start-up costs. This system achieved similar plant growth, fruit yield, and fruit grades as conventional single-head systems on four seedless cucumber varieties/breeding lines. Since transplant costs for the twin-head system are

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Hanna Y. Hanna

week for 19 weeks. Fruit with blossom-end rot and other defects were removed, and the remainder were graded according to U.S. Department of Agriculture standards ( USDA, 1997 ). Early marketable yield was determined by weighing fruit graded medium or

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Brian A. Kahn

, three specific analyses were performed to examine possible effects of height to pedicel attachment and height to blossom end on total cull fruit production, diseased fruit production, and scarred fruit production as well as cultivar × fruit grade

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Hanna Y. Hanna

determined by weighing fruit graded medium or larger in the first five harvests. Total marketable yield was determined by weighing fruit graded medium or larger in all harvests. Cull yield was the weight of all fruit with visible defects and small size. Mean

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David M. Butler, Gary E. Bates, and Sarah E. Eichler Inwood

culled eggplant fruit yield in 2011 as affected by management system. Within fruit grade, means are not significantly different, P > 0.05. Error bars are the 95% confidence intervals of the mean. Management systems: Till (+ACC), spring tillage with

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Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez

2010, shading resulted in improved yield and quality of ripe bell pepper fruit ( Fig. 3 ). Number of fruit with different marketable fruit grades varied in response to shade level. Number of Fancy, US1, and total marketable fruit increased to a maximum

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Hanna Y. Hanna

). Marketable yield was determined by weighing fruit graded medium or larger during the first 3 weeks and during the remaining 16 weeks of harvest to reflect the effects of the early growth interruption of grafted and stump sprout plants on yield. Data were

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Celina Gómez, Robert C. Morrow, C. Michael Bourget, Gioia D. Massa, and Cary A. Mitchell

) was used for groups of four HPS lamps. Removal of lower leaves and plant leaning and lowering was conducted as needed. Fruits were pruned to four per cluster (to maintain fruit grade/size uniformity) and were harvested twice weekly when the point fruit

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Bradley J. Rickard, David R. Rudell, and Christopher B. Watkins

each grade and fruit size. Here, the focus is not on fruit size but on fruit grades. We are interested in simulating the economic implications of storage technologies that have the capacity to change the share of fruit that is marketed in higher grade