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Joan R. Davenport and Carolyn DeMoranville

97 ORAL SESSION 20 (Abstr. 524–531) Small Fruit/Viticulture: Production & Physiology of Raspberries/Blueberries/Cranberries

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Laura K. Hunsberger, Carolyn J. DeMoranville, Hilary A. Sandler, and Wesley R. Autio

This paper is a portion of a thesis submitted by the senior author in fulfilling master's degree requirements. We acknowledge the excellent technical assistance of Melissa Cannon and Liz Little. We also thank L. Briggs, Decas Cranberry Company

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Jennifer Johnson-Cicalese, James J. Polashock, Josh A. Honig, Jennifer Vaiciunas, Daniel L. Ward, and Nicholi Vorsa

Native to North America, the american cranberry is largely endemic to acidic soils of northeastern United States and southeastern Canada ( Vander Kloet, 1983 ), but it is cultivated in a broad range of temperate climatic conditions. Domesticated in

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Luping Qu, James Polashock, and Nicholi Vorsa

97 ORAL SESSION 20 (Abstr. 524–531) Small Fruit/Viticulture: Production & Physiology of Raspberries/Blueberries/Cranberries

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R. Karina Gallardo, Parichat Klingthong, Qi Zhang, James Polashock, Amaya Atucha, Juan Zalapa, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, Nicholi Vorsa, and Massimo Iorizzo

North America, led by the United States, is the world’s largest producer of cranberries ( Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). In 2016, the United States produced 68% (419,606 t) of the global cranberry production, followed by Canada with 29% (179,574 t

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Carolyn DeMoranville and Joan Davenport

97 ORAL SESSION 20 (Abstr. 524–531) Small Fruit/Viticulture: Production & Physiology of Raspberries/Blueberries/Cranberries

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Katherine M. Ghantous, Hilary A. Sandler, Wesley R. Autio, and Peter Jeranyama

Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a long-lived woody perennial with slender trailing stems that grows in acidic sandy soils. Cranberries in the United States are produced primarily in Massachusetts, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Washington, and

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Kevin R. Kosola and Beth Ann A. Workmaster

Cranberry and other members of the Ericaceae commonly form ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) associations with fungi [e.g., Rhizoscyphus ericae (D.J. Read) W.Y. Zhuang and Korf [syn. Hymenoscyphus ericae (D.J. Read) Korf and Kernan] ( Allen et al

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Thierry E. Besançon

Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a low-growing, woody, perennial vine native to eastern North America that grows in moist acidic soils with variable organic matter content. In New Jersey, large-fruited cranberry is a common native

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Paul J. Croft, Mark D. Shulman, and Roni Avissar

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ericaceae Ait.) stomatal conductivity (SC) was investigated in the field to examine plant response as a function of weather conditions. Measurements were made during fruit maturation on 14 days between 0540 and 1710 h r, as weather conditions permitted. SC ranged from 0.02 to 0.08 cm·s-1 and was much lower than for most other crops. Scatter plots of SC vs. leaf temperature by day indicated only a weak linear relationship. When the data were stratified by time of day and by clear and overcast skies, several significant Pearson correlation coefficients suggested a stomatal response. The findings, when combined with current knowledge of the physical structure of cranberry stomata, suggest that cranberries behave as xeromorphic plants.