Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 135 items for :

  • "bitter pit" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Open access

Nadia A. Valverdi and Lee Kalcsits

( Gallardo et al., 2015 ; Serban, 2018 ). ‘Honeycrisp’ is challenging to grow because of its high susceptibility to physiological disorders such as bitter pit, which normally causes losses of ≈20%, but which can be up to 75% in extreme cases ( Cheng and Sazo

Free access

Juan Pablo Zoffoli, Valentina Sanguedolce, Paulina Naranjo, and Carolina Contreras

‘Granny Smith’ is the most common green apple cultivar in the world. However, it is highly susceptible to physiological disorders such as superficial scald and bitter pit ( Mitcham et al., 1996 ). These disorders reduce the effective storage time

Full access

Yosef Al Shoffe and Christopher B. Watkins

challenging for storage operators. At low temperatures around 33 °F, the cultivar can develop symptoms of chilling injury (CI) such as soft scald and soggy breakdown, whereas at a higher temperature of 38 °F the fruit can be susceptible to bitter pit

Open access

Wesley R. Autio, William J. Bramlage, and Sarah A. Weis

Abstract

Equations were developed that could predict the incidence of senescent breakdown, bitter pit, and decay in ‘Cox's Orange Pippin’ apples and senescent breakdown and bitter pit in ‘Bramley's Seedling’ apples. The parameters used to predict the incidences of disorders included fruit Ca, P, and K concentrations; fruit weight; respiration rate; and fruit maturity. Each disorder and each cultivar had a unique prediction equation. Such equations must be established individually for a disorder, cultivar, and, probably, growing region. Given an appropriate data base, this method seems to have broad applicability as a predictive tool for these disorders. However, core flush and low temperature breakdown could not be predicted using the parameters measured in this study.

Free access

Renae E. Moran, Jennifer R. DeEll, and Dennis P. Murr

in 2002 to 2005 and 2 to 3 months in 2006 and 2007. Occurrence of soft scald, soggy breakdown, and bitter pit was measured 7 d after removal from cold storage in 2002 through 2005 and 1 d after in subsequent years. Soft scald was defined as external

Free access

Carl J. Rosen, Peter M. Bierman, Adriana Telias, and Emily E. Hoover

Application of calcium (Ca) sprays is a recommended practice to reduce the incidence of Ca-related disorders such as bitter pit in apple (Malus ×domestica), but effectiveness of sprays to increase Ca concentrations in the fruit is not always consistent. Strontium (Sr) has been used as a Ca analog to evaluate Ca transport processes and distribution in plants. A field study was conducted using foliar- and fruit-applied Sr as a tracer for Ca transport in 20-year-old `Honeycrisp' apple trees on Malling.26 (M.26) rootstock. The objectives of this study were to 1) measure the amount of Sr translocation from leaves to fruit, 2) determine the effectiveness of eight sprays applied over the growing season vs. four late-season sprays on increasing Sr concentrations in leaves and fruit, and 3) evaluate the effect of an experimental adjuvant consisting of alkyl-polysaccharides and monosaccharides on spray efficacy. Seven treatments were tested, which included a control and six Sr treatments applied in various combinations with or without an adjuvant. Trees were sprayed four or eight times during the growing season, either directly to leaves and fruit or to leaves only (fruit covered during application). Spray treatments did not significantly affect total fruit fresh or dry weight. Although some discrimination between Ca and Sr was detected, the similar distribution of Ca and Sr in fruit tissue of control treatments suggested that Sr is a suitable tracer for Ca. Based on the covered vs. uncovered fruit treatments, about 11% to 17% of the Sr in the fruit came from Sr applied directly to the leaves. Eight spray applications over the growing season more than doubled both the concentration and content of fruit Sr compared with four late season sprays. The tested adjuvant doubled Sr absorption by and translocation to fruit compared with not using an adjuvant. Assuming similar transport for Ca and Sr, and adjusting for the atomic weight of Ca relative to Sr, the maximum increase in fruit Ca concentration at harvest from foliar and fruit applications (eight sprays with adjuvant and uncovered fruit) would have been as follows: core = 78 mg·kg–1; flesh = 35 mg·kg–1; peel = 195 mg·kg–1; entire fruit = 67 mg·kg–1. In addition to being an underused tool for studying Ca transport patterns, the results also suggest that use of Sr may be a novel technique for testing the efficacy of various adjuvants used to enhance uptake and transport of Ca in leaves and fruit.

Open access

K. J. Scott and R. B. H. Wills

Abstract

Bitter pit was controlled and senescence delayed in apples stored at ambient temperature (~20°C) by dipping the fruit in calcium chloride after harvest. The application of a partial vacuum while fruit were submerged was the most effective method. This permitted rinsing of the fruit afterwards to reduce the likelihood of skin injury.

Free access

William D. Wolk, O.L. Lau, G.H. Neilsen, and Brian G. Drought

A study was undertaken to identify key factors associated with storage disorders in three commercially important apple cultivars in British Columbia and to determine how early in the season associations could be measured. Fruit mass, density, and concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and dry matter were determined for `McIntosh', `Spartan', and `Golden Delicious' apples (Malus ×domestica Borkh) from ≈30 commercial orchards 9, 6, 3, and 0 weeks before harvest. Storage samples were collected at commercial harvest and evaluated for the development of internal breakdown (`McIntosh' and `Spartan') or bitter pit (`Golden Delicious') after 4 and 6 months of 0 °C air storage. Mass and [Ca] and the mass/[Ca] and [K]/[Ca] ratios were the factors most often significantly correlated with storage disorders within each year for all three cultivars. Correlations were as frequently significant 6 and 3 weeks before harvest as they were at harvest. Mass of `McIntosh' and `Spartan' was the only variable consistently related with breakdown in all 3 years of the study. There were no variables with a consistent relationship to bitter pit in `Golden Delicious'. Fruit [Ca] was associated with the relative levels of disorders within years but could not be associated with specific levels of disorders across all years.

Free access

Frank J. Peryea, Denise Neilsen, and Gerry Neilsen

The recommendations for boron (B) sprays in deciduous tree fruit orchards have changed little over the past 50 years. We conducted two 3-year field studies evaluating the effect of two modifications to the existing recommendation for B maintenance sprays on apple (Malus ×domestica) tree nutritional status. A widely recommended Na polyborate-based commercial B spray product was used as the B source. Postbloom sprays of B applied at the recommended annual B maintenance rate of 0.56 kg·ha-1 to `Scarlet Gala' apple trees consistently increased fruit B concentration but had a weaker effect on leaf B concentration in early August, the recommended timing for sampling leaves for mineral element analysis. Applying half or all of the annual B maintenance rate in a spray at the pink flowering stage increased flower cluster and early-season leaf B concentrations as well as having positive effects on fruit and leaf B concentrations. The pink sprays increased flower cluster Na concentration but had no effect on leaf and fruit Na concentrations. In the second study, one-quarter of the annual B fertilizer requirement was tank-mixed with each of four biweekly CaCl2 sprays applied starting in early June for bitter pit control. This treatment consistently increased `Scarlet Gala' fruit B concentration but had a lesser effect on August leaf B concentration. It did not interfere with fruit Ca status, and increased both fruit and leaf Na concentrations. Leaf Na concentration in all treatments was substantially lower than levels associated with specific Na toxicity of deciduous fruit trees. The results of these experiments indicate that applying B sprays at the pink flowering stage timing and tank-mixing B with CaCl2 sprays applied for bitter pit control are useful practices to enhance B spray efficacy and convenience of application.

Free access

Corina Serban, Lee Kalcsits, Jennifer DeEll, and James P. Mattheis

and Tong, 2011 ). Increased ‘Honeycrisp’ production ( U.S. Apple Association, 2018 ) has resulted in a need for strategies to improve the storage performance to maintain quality and reduce fruit losses. One challenge is controlling bitter pit, a