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Daniel J. Bell, Lisa J. Rowland, James J. Polashock, and Frank A. Drummond

Lowbush blueberry ( Vaccinium angustifolium , section Cyanococcus A. Gray, Ericaceae) is a unique agricultural crop of northeastern North America in that it is wild in origin. Plants are not sown but have been left to reclaim burned and cleared

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Samir C. Debnath

Lowbush blueberry ( Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.), a perennial, rhizomatous, cross-pollinated shrub ( Vander Kloet, 1988 ), is a commercially important crop in Maine, Quebec, and the Canadian Atlantic Provinces in North America. The berries are

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Robert K. Prange and Perry D. Lidster

Larvae of the blueberry maggot (Rhagoletis mendax Curran) were raised on apples (Malus domestics Borkh. cv. Idared), and exposed larvae were treated 48 hours with CO concentrations ranging from 0% to 100% at O concentrations of 2%, 5%, or 20% (0% for the 100% CO) at 5 or 21C. Blueberry maggot survival was reduced to 10% when the larvae were subjected to CO concentrations > 45% at 21C. Fumigation was more effective at 21C than at 5C. Oxygen at 2% or 5% did not reduce larval survival when compared with treatments containing 20% O. In a separate experiment, six commercial shipments, each consisting of four hundred eighty 0.5-liter containers of infested lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustlfolium Ait.), were placed in a large fiberglass tank and fumigated with 54% CO at 21C. The blueberries were sampled for quality and larval survival after 24 and 48 hours of CO treatment. Atter 48 hours, 9% of the blueberry maggots in infested blueberries survived fumigation with 54% CO, while 68% of maggots survived in air. The quality of fumigated lowbush blueberries was not adversely affected by fumigation with 54% CO for up to 48 hours, as indicated by marketable berries, berry weight, split berries, shriveled berries, epicuticular wax (bloom), firmness, soluble solids and titratable acid concentrations, offflavors, and skin browning.

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt

Inbreeding coefficients were calculated for highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars based on a tetrasomic inheritance model. This model yielded lower inbreeding coefficients than previous calculations based on a disomic tetraploid inheritance model. Recent trends in breeding have resulted in significant use of V. darrowi Camp as a source of low-chilling germplasm for use in the southern United States. There is also a trend toward increased inbreeding in several crosses from which recently released cultivars have been derived. Increased inbreeding coefficients do not represent a detrimental situation in blueberry per se.

Open access

Lewis E. Aalders, Ivan V. Hall, and Avard C. Brydon

Abstract

Seed production based on number of seeds per berry differed in 4 clones of lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. Large seeds were more viable than small seeds.

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Scott Neil White and Linshan Zhang

.V. Alders, L.E. Nickerson, N.L. Vander Kloet, S.P. 1979 The biological flora of Canada. 1. Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., sweet lowbush blueberry Can. Field Nat. 93 415 430 10.2307/2995895 Ismail, A.A. Hanson, E.J. 1982 Interaction of method and date of

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Daniel J. Bell, Lisa J. Rowland, John Stommel, and Frank A. Drummond

and genetic factors influencing yield in lowbush blueberry ( Vaccinium angustifolium ) in Maine PhD Diss., Univ. of Maine, School of Biological Sciences Orono, ME Bell, D.J. Rowland, L.J. Polashock, J

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Juran C. Goyali, Abir U. Igamberdiev, and Samir C. Debnath

EST and genomic libraries Mol. Ecol. Notes 5 657 660 Bushway, R.J. Gann, D.F.M. Cook, W.P. Bushway, A.A. 1983 Mineral and vitamin content of lowbush blueberries ( Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) J. Food Sci. 48 1878 Česonienė, L. Daubaras, R. Paulauskas

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Richard E. Harrison, James J. Luby, and Peter D. Ascher

Pollination of the half-high blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L./V. anugustifolium Ait.) cultivars St. Cloud, Northsky, Northcountry, and Northblue with self, outcross, and outcross/self pollen mixtures suggests that outcross fertilization maximizes percent fruit set, berry weight, seeds per berry, and seeds per pollination while minimizing days to harvest. Based on these results, mixed plantings of at least two blueberry cultivars are recommended for these cultivars. Fruit and seed set were negatively associated with increased percentages of self pollen in outcross/self pollen mixtures. These responses were linear for `Northblue' due to a tendency to parthenocarpy, and nonlinear for `St. Cloud', `Northsky', and `Northcountry', due to low fruit set following self-pollination. These data indicate that post-fertilization abortion affected seed formation, which was, in turn, correlated positively with fruit set.

Open access

I. V. Hall, F. R. Forsyth, H. J. Lightfoot, and R. Boch

Abstract

Nectar from flowers of the lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait was found to evolve acetaldehyde at a rate of approx 0.047 μg/g nectar/hr and ethyl alcohol, the only other volatile detected, in smaller amounts.