Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 141 items for :

  • " Tagetes erecta " x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Joyce G. Latimer

Seeds of marigold (Tagetes erects L. `Janie') were sown in flats of three cell sizes (inverted pyramids, Todd 080A, 100A, or 175; volume 7, 24, or 44 cm3, respectively) or in flats of different root cell configurations [Todd 100A, Grow-Tech (GT) 200, or Growing Systems (GS) 135; shaped as inverted pyramid, cylinder, or cylinder with a bottom lip, respectively]. During 2 consecutive years, plants grown in Todd 080A trays had 60% less leaf area and shoot and root dry weights than plants grown in Todd 175 trays. Plants grown in Todd 100A trays had 30% less leaf area and shoot and root dry weights than plants grown in the larger volume tray. Stem length was less affected by container size. The rate of shoot dry weight gain during the 3 weeks after transplanting in the field was greater in plants from the smaller containers (Todd 080A and Todd 100A) in 1987. Final height (7 weeks after planting) of plants from Todd 080A or Todd 100A flats was 12% and 7% less, respectively, than those of plants grown in Todd 175 flats, while final plant quality was reduced 34% and 21%, respectively, in plants from these flats in 1987. Similar, but smaller, effects were recorded in 1988. Container type had little effect on plant growth in the greenhouse and no effect on growth in the landscape. The maximum quality rating in the landscape, awarded to plants from Todd 100A flats, was 12% greater than that of plants from GT 200 flats in 1987 and 5% and 9% greater than plants from GT 200 and GS 135 flats, respectively, in 1988. Final plant performance of marigold seedlings was reduced more by root restriction or transplant size than previously reported with vegetable species.

Free access

Luis A. Valdez-Aguilar, Catherine M. Grieve, and James Poss

6 Feb. 2007. Plugs of ‘French Vanilla’ (five plugs) ( Tagetes patula L.), ‘Yellow Climax’ (three plugs) ( Tagetes erecta L.), and ‘Flagstaff’ (three plugs) ( Tagetes erecta L.) were transplanted on 8 Mar. 2007 into each of 30 sand tanks containing

Free access

Dennis N. Portz and Gail R. Nonnecke

Li, 2003 ). Sorghum bicolor rotated with strawberry showed low counts of weeds and pathogenic nematodes and fungi ( Elmer, 1999 ; Kratochvil et al., 2004 ; LaMondia et al., 2002 ; McSorley and Gallaher, 1993 ). Tagetes erecta ‘Crackerjack

Free access

Raymond A. Cloyd, Cindy L. Galle, Stephen R. Keith, and Kenneth E. Kemp

spider mite. Untreated marigold ( Tagetes erecta ‘Antiqua Yellow’) plants in the vegetative stage were transplanted into 0.9-L containers filled with Fafard 3B growing medium consisting of peatmoss, perlite, vermiculite, and processed pine bark (Conrad

Free access

Paul V. Nelson, Cheon-Young Song, Jinsheng Huang, Carl E. Niedziela Jr., and William H. Swallow

to assess reproducibility of the first for gomphrena and to extend the test plant crops to impatiens ( Impatiens wallerana ‘Super Elfin White’), petunia ( Petunia × hybrida ‘Madness White’), and marigold ( Tagetes erecta ‘Antigua Yellow’). Nine

Free access

Lesley A. Judd, Brian E. Jackson, and William C. Fonteno

observations and measurements and the attached collar, ( B ) the screened bottom, and ( C ) a complete planted rhizometer with foil attached for light exclusion. Root effects on physical properties. On 14 Mar. 2012, marigold ( Tagetes erecta ‘Inca Orange

Free access

Raymond A. Cloyd, Cindy L. Galle, Stephen R. Keith, and Kenneth E. Kemp

to adhere to the leaf surface and did not drop off the plant. Expt. 2: Effect of miticides with contact and translaminar activity on control of twospotted spider mite. Thirty ‘Antiqua Gold’ marigold ( Tagetes erecta ) plants obtained from Eason

Open access

Nan Tang, Wuhua Zhang, Liwen Chen, Yan Wang, and Daocheng Tang

Marigold ( Tagetes erecta ) is commercially cultivated worldwide because of its ornamental, industrial, and medicinal values ( Ayyadurai et al., 2013 ). The flower is a typical capitulum that consists of ray florets and disc florets. The

Free access

Touria E. Eaton, Douglas A. Cox, and Allen V. Barker

evaluate liquid fish, oilseed extract, and alfalfa pellets, used either alone or in combination, for plant growth and N leaching from two commonly grown floricultural crops, marigold ( Tagetes erecta L. ‘First Lady’) and calibrachoa ( Calibrachoa

Free access

Tasneem M. Vaid, Erik S. Runkle, and Jonathan M. Frantz

input, availability, and lack of published information. American marigold ( Tagetes erecta ‘Inca II Mix’), cup flower ( Nierembergia caerulea ‘Purple Robe’), diascia ( Diascia barberae ‘Diamonte Mix’), flowering tobacco ( Nicotiana alata ‘Perfume