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Michael Dossett, Jill M. Bushakra, Barbara Gilmore, Carol A. Koch, Chaim Kempler, Chad E. Finn, and Nahla V. Bassil

Black raspberry is a relatively minor, but significant, horticultural specialty crop in North America. The majority of black raspberry acreage in North America is in Oregon, where it is grown primarily for processing and had a farm gate value in

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M. Pilar Bañados, Carolina Alvarez, and Alejandra Soto

97 ORAL SESSION 20 (Abstr. 524–531) Small Fruit/Viticulture: Production & Physiology of Raspberries/Blueberries/Cranberries

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Rebecca L. Darnell, Horacio E. Alvarado-Raya, and Jeffrey G. Williamson

There is increasing interest in off-season production of raspberry, necessitating the need for new cropping systems. In subtropical areas, an annual production system has been examined ( Darnell et al., 2006 ; Knight et al., 1996 ). This system

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Carlo Fallovo, Valerio Cristofori, Emilio Mendoza de-Gyves, Carlos Mario Rivera, Roberto Rea, Simone Fanasca, Cristina Bignami, Youssef Sassine, and Youssef Rouphael

fruit leaf areas such as raspberry ( Rubus idaeus L.), redcurrant ( Ribes rubrum L.), blackberry ( Rubus fruticosus L.), gooseberry ( Ribes grossularia L.), and highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is still lacking despite some studies on

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Stephen F. Klauer, Chuhe Chen, and J. Scott Cameron

97 ORAL SESSION 20 (Abstr. 524–531) Small Fruit/Viticulture: Production & Physiology of Raspberries/Blueberries/Cranberries

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Julia M. Harshman, Wayne M. Jurick II, Kim S. Lewers, Shiow Y. Wang, and Christopher S. Walsh

Raspberries ( Rubus sp.) are the third most popular berry in the United States ( Geisler, 2012 ) and a growing specialty crop for both the wholesale industry and smaller, local markets, and U-pick. Postharvest susceptibility to gray mold ( Botrytis

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Patrick P. Moore

1 Scientist. This research was partially funded by the Washington Red Raspberry Commission and Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission. Washington State University, College of Agriculture and Home Economics

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Patrick P. Moore

1 Scientist. This research was partially funded by the Washington Red Raspberry Commission and the Oregon Raspberry and Black-berry Commission. Washington State Univ., College of Agriculture and Home Economics

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D.A. Raworth and S.J. Clements

. Fitzpatrick for reviewing the manuscript. The work was supported in part by the Lower Mainland Horticultural Improvement Association, the B.C. Raspberry Growers' Association, the Federal Challenge Program, and Energy Mines and Resources Canada (PERD). The cost

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Thomas W. Walters, John N. Pinkerton, Ekaterini Riga, Inga A. Zasada, Michael Particka, Harvey A. Yoshida, and Chris Ishida

Plant–parasitic nematodes are major pests of red raspberry, reducing yield and cane growth, and leading to economic losses in many production regions ( Belair, 1991 ; McElroy, 1991 ; Szczygiel and Rebandel, 1988 ; Trudgill, 1986 ). Three plant