Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 416 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Open access

Matthew S. Lobdell and Kimberly Shearer

Shiuchi and Fujita (2006 ). The only other species with multiple ploidy reports is S. hookeri , with a diploid count published ( Mehra and Bawa, 1969 ) in addition to the previously mentioned tetraploid count. The only cultivar with reported ploidy is S

Open access

Rebekah C.I. Maynard and John M. Ruter

nature of Salvia and vast geographic spread, remarkable variations in chromosome number and ploidy exist across the genus. Ploidy levels range from diploid to octoploid, and chromosome base numbers include x = 6–11, 13, 14, 15, 17, and 19 ( Delestaing

Free access

Kimberly Shearer and Thomas G. Ranney

( Adams and Wendel, 2005 ; Comai, 2005 ; Hegarty and Hiscock, 2008 ; Soltis and Burleigh, 2009 ). Knowledge of ploidy levels is important for plant breeders because it can influence fertility, crossability, segregation, and gene expression ( Chen and Ni

Open access

Haiyan Li, Junhai Niu, Luping Sun, Ya Li, Qingyun Leng, Jinhua Chen, Jinran Zhang, Yanan Yanan, Chao Ma, and Hernán Ariel López

with the International Bougainvillea Registration Authority. Many more varieties with various flower colors, bract types, flowering periods, and stress resistance are always needed for family potting and public landscaping. Ploidy is an important

Free access

Ying Wang, Cale A. Bigelow, and Yiwei Jiang

ploidy level of known germplasms is unclear. The mixed ploidy levels in the grass population could also be challenging to marker development and gene identification, ultimately influencing marker-assisted selection to improve desirable traits. In addition

Free access

Jason D. Lattier, Hsuan Chen, and Ryan N. Contreras

investigated have been tetraploid, higher ploidy levels have been reported including hexaploids (‘Aphrodite’, ‘Diana’, ‘Helene’, ‘Minerva’, ‘Melrose’, ‘Pink Giant’, and ‘Shimsan’) and octoploids (‘Purple CV’, ‘Purple CV 2 ’, ‘Red Heart CV’, ‘Sp 1 ’, Sp 2 ’, and

Free access

Jason D. Lattier, Hsuan Chen, and Ryan N. Contreras

Genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level are important biological parameters for plant breeding, systematics, and evolution. Since the first published chromosome counts of plants in 1882 ( Garbari et al., 2012 ), ≈25% of angiosperms have

Free access

Jason D. Lattier, Thomas G. Ranney, Paul R. Fantz, and Tony Avent

are complex. Previous karyological studies have demonstrated the basic chromosome number for liriopogons to be x = 18 (rarely x = 17) with high levels of polyploidy in many species ( Table 1 ). Also, Fukai et al. (2008) investigated ploidy level

Free access

Todd J. Rounsaville and Thomas G. Ranney

consideration in plant breeding because it can influence crossability, morphology, fertility, and gene expression ( Chen and Ni, 2006 ; Soltis et al., 2004 ). Sampling of ploidy levels has been very limited for Mahonia taxa. Mahonia aquifolium , M

Free access

Joseph J. Rothleutner, Mara W. Friddle, and Ryan N. Contreras

ploidy series, with estimates of 70% tetraploid (2 n = 4 x = 68), 15% triploid (2 n = 3 x = 51), and 10% diploid (2 n = 2 x = 34), and the remaining species of greater ploidy level ( Fryer and Hylmö, 2009 ). Apomixis is common in Cotoneaster and