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Qi Zhang, Enda Yu, and Andy Medina

interspecific inbred lines with normal compatibility by varietal recombination among the three species and successive selection through different mating and selection methods. Meanwhile, some important traits such as plant habits, fruit types, multiple disease

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Yanbin Su, Yumei Liu, Huolin Shen, Xingguo Xiao, Zhansheng Li, Zhiyuan Fang, Limei Yang, Mu Zhuang, and Yangyong Zhang

better estimate of trait heritability and increasing QTL detection ability ( Pink et al., 2008 ; Simon et al., 2008 ). At the same time, multiple mapping methods for detecting QTLs are needed to effectively identify and verify important QTLs ( Su et al

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Gad G. Yousef, Mary A. Lila, Ivette Guzman, James R. Ballington, and Allan F. Brown

populations are presented in Appendix A . Breeding selections and populations were created and selected for traits not directly related to their ANC profiles and are therefore likely representative of the current selection objectives of most public and

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Ana Fita, Néstor Tarín, Jaime Prohens, and Adrián Rodríguez-Burruezo

particularly true for those aspects related to the selection of plants for mating, the importance of the genetic control of the trait(s) of interest, the number of individuals to be evaluated in each generation, the propagation material to be used for the next

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David H. Byrne, Patricia Klein, Muqing Yan, Ellen Young, Jeekin Lau, Kevin Ong, Madalyn Shires, Jennifer Olson, Mark Windham, Tom Evans, and Danielle Novick

, substantial time can be saved by using this technique ( Table 6 ). Beyond giving a savings in time, the use of markers allows selection for a trait in the greenhouse and avoids the selection phase in the field which is very expensive. The selection advantage

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Charles J. Wasonga, Marcial A. Pastor-Corrales, Timothy G. Porch, and Phillip D. Griffiths

( Muchui et al., 2008 ). The small-sieve snap bean cultivars currently grown in East Africa lack the optimal combinations of traits for more efficient production that would be provided by incorporation of rust resistance and tolerance to high

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Renée L. Eriksen, Caleb Knepper, Michael D. Cahn, and Beiquan Mou

grow similarly under high and low water treatments, and thus have a nonsignificant difference in the trait among treatments). Tukey’s hsd post hoc multiple comparison tests were done, but are not reported here because they were often too lenient for

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Josh A. Honig, Megan F. Muehlbauer, John M. Capik, Christine Kubik, Jennifer N. Vaiciunas, Shawn A. Mehlenbacher, and Thomas J. Molnar

) markers to study the diversity of A. anomala samples collected from multiple locations across the United States. Studies showed that A. anomala isolates collected from Oregon were genetically similar, whereas isolates collected from east of the Rocky

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Jeff Olsen

program has also selected for other traits beneficial to commercial production such as uniformly early nut maturation, larger kernel size expressed as a percentage of the whole nut weight, and improved kernel quality. The following completely resistant

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Charles J. Wasonga, Marcial A. Pastor-Corrales, Timothy G. Porch, and Phillip D. Griffiths

genetic resistance strategies to manage bean rust should therefore aim to combine multiple rust resistance genes to provide a broader and longer lasting or more durable resistance ( Pastor-Corrales, 2006 ; Pastor-Corrales et al., 2007 ). Genetic variation