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Todd J. Rounsaville, Darren H. Touchell, Thomas G. Ranney, and Frank A. Blazich

ideal platform for manipulating ploidy level, harvesting chemical compounds, and initiating embryogenesis ( Alvarez et al., 2009 ; Herbert et al., 2010 ; Pierik, 1997 ). Studies on micropropagation of ornamental varieties of Berberis and Mahonia

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Jane Kahia, Peter Njenga, and Margaret Kirika

to scale-up its production. There is therefore need to explore alternative propagation methods. Micropropagation is advantageous over traditional propagation, as it can be used to provide a sufficient number of plantlets for planting from a stock

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Susan M. Hawkins and Carol D. Robacker

stock plants ( Meyer, 2012 ); however, the number of new plants is limited by the number of stock plants to be divided ( Robacker and Corley, 1992 ). Micropropagation is a more effective method of propagation to obtain large numbers of new plants

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Cristian Silvestri, Gianmarco Sabbatini, Federico Marangelli, Eddo Rugini, and Valerio Cristofori

culture techniques represents a rapid way to produce uniform materials in a short time to meet agriculture needs. The application of micropropagation for commercial-scale plant production has been well demonstrated in several plant species that contain

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Enio Tiago de Oliveira, Otto Jesu Crocomo, Tatiana Bistaco Farinha, and Luiz Antônio Gallo

, this article describes a complete micropropagation system involving disinfection, in vitro multiplication, rooting, and hardening followed by ex vitro acclimatization procedures used to attain that objective, thus producing thousands of Aloe vera

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Youping Sun, Donglin Zhang, and John Smagula

growing medium ( Fig. 1K ). Literature Cited Bernasconi, N.K. Mroginski, L.A. Sansberro, P.A. Rey, H.Y. 1998 Micropropagation of yerba mate ( Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.): Effect of genotype and season

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Adam Dale, Becky R. Hughes, and Danielle Donnelly

Micropropagation has been used successfully for strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa L.) for over 30 years ( Boxus, 1974 ; Swartz and Lindstrom, 1986 ). This has been applied, often together with thermotherapy, to produce specific pathogen

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Jeffrey Adelberg, Robert Pollock, Nihal Rajapakse, and Roy Young

159 ORAL SESSION 45 (Abstr. 687–693) Micropropagation–Floriculture/Ornamental Horticulture

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Erika Szendrak and Paul E. Read

159 ORAL SESSION 45 (Abstr. 687–693) Micropropagation–Floriculture/Ornamental Horticulture

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Tracy S. Hawkins, Nathan M. Schiff, Emile S. Gardiner, Theodor Leininger, Margaret S. Devall, Dan Wilson, Paul Hamel, Deborah D. McCown, and Kristina Connor

Micropropagation has proven to be useful in research and conservation of endangered plant species. In efforts to sustain naturally occurring populations, micropropagation has been used to maintain and restore genetic diversity ( Godt et al., 1997