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Stephanie A. Beeks and Michael R. Evans

biocontainers. Biocontainers are generally defined as containers that are not petroleum based and break down quickly when planted into the soil or placed into a compost pile. Biocontainers are generally categorized as being plantable or compostable ( Evans and

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Michael R. Evans, Andrew K. Koeser, Guihong Bi, Susmitha Nambuthiri, Robert Geneve, Sarah Taylor Lovell, and J. Ryan Stewart

typically discarded. As a result, large volumes of plastic waste are stored at greenhouse sites or sent to landfills. Biocontainer use offers one potential solution to this solid waste issue. Biocontainers consist of plant- or animal

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Andrew K. Koeser, Sarah T. Lovell, Aaron C. Petri, Robin G. Brumfield, and J. Ryan Stewart

labeling, the adoption of biocontainers (plant material-based, biodegradable pots) as an alternative to the use of conventional plastic containers can be a significant driver of consumer interest. Yue et al. (2011) found that biodegradable, compostable

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, James A. Schrader, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

production ( Flax et al., 2017 ). Thus, our objectives were to 1) quantify and compare growth of herbaceous perennials grown in different (predominately unprotected, outdoor) production environments using two types of bioplastic-based biocontainers to plants

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Susmitha Nambuthiri, Robert L. Geneve, Youping Sun, Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Genhua Niu, Guihong Bi, and Amy Fulcher

weight change. Hourly and cumulative evaporative water loss over 8 h was calculated. There were five replicates for each type of nursery container. In biocontainers like WP, the initial temperature and water vapor values observed with new containers under

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Michael R. Evans, Matt Taylor, and Jeff Kuehny

situations, reducing the use of plastic containers by increasing the use of biocontainers is one strategy that could reduce the amount of waste plastic generated by greenhouse operations. Biocontainers are generally defined as containers that are not produced

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Jeff S. Kuehny, Matt Taylor, and Michael R. Evans

(Western Pulp Products)]. The 4-inch plastic container served as the control for all 4-inch biocontainers, whereas the 5-inch plastic container served as the control for the 5-inch OP47 and 5-inch rice straw container. Greenhouse production. ‘Score Red

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Kenneth G. McCabe, James A. Schrader, Samy Madbouly, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

negative environmental impacts. Fiber-based biocontainers have emerged as sustainable alternatives to petroleum-plastic containers, but growers’ acceptance of them has been low because of their higher cost and limited availability when compared with

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Nicholas J. Flax, Christopher J. Currey, Alexander G. Litvin, James A. Schrader, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

persistent waste ( Schrader, 2013 ). Biocontainers, manufactured from renewable, bio-based materials, offer an alternative to container-crop producers that may be as or more sustainable than petroleum-based plastic containers ( Koeser et al., 2014 ). Although

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Stephanie A. Beeks and Michael R. Evans

typically discarded, and this results in large amounts of waste plastic containers going to landfills. One potential solution to the large amounts of waste plastic greenhouse containers is the use of biocontainers. Biocontainers are generally defined as