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Angelos K. Kanellis, Leonard L. Morris, and Mikal E. Saltveit Jr.

Abstract

Parthenocarpic cucumber fruit (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Deliva) of marketable maturity (10 to 14 days after anthesis) were held at 12.5° or 20°C in reduced O2 levels for 5 or 18 days before transfer to air. Carbon dioxide production at reduced O2 levels was generally less than in air; however, at O2 levels < 0.5%, anaerobic respiration resulted in increased rates of CO2 production. Upon transfer to air after 18 days, all samples from reduced O2 showed increased CO2 production rates that equalled or exceeded that of the air controls. Except at 0.0% and 0.25% O2 levels, ethylene production was increased in reduced O2. After transfer to air, ethylene production increased and the increase was inversely related to the previous O2 level. Ethanol and acetaldehyde production were measureable for fruit held in 1% O2 after 18 days at 12.5° and showed dramatic increases at lower O2 levels. Low-O2 injury (pitting) developed on most fruit held at 0.0% O2 and on many fruit held at 0.25% O2. Only minima! commercial benefits are likely to be realized from storage of 1 to 3 weeks in 0.5% to 2.0% O2 at 12.5°.

Open access

Robert E. Pauli, Nancy Jung Chen, and Theodore T. C. Goo

Abstract

Methods were investigated to control weight loss and sprouting of stored ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale Rosc), including waxing, sprout inhibitors, and gamma irradiation. Rhizomes stored for 3 months at 22°C and 70% RH lost about 20% weight. Waxing of the rhizome did not reduce water loss. Some wax treatments increased the number and length of sprouts. Preharvest application of maleic hydrazide significantly increased the number and reduced the length of sprouts. Postharvest CIPC application significantly reduced the length of sprouts. Vacuum infiltration increased the effectiveness of CIPC in reducing sprout length. Gamma and X-ray irradiation also reduced sprout number and length. Minimum doses of gamma radiation for sprout control was 25 Gy and 120 to 150 Gy for X-ray irradiation if the rhizome was stored for more than 3 months at 22°. A higher dose of irradiation (500 Gy) was required if complete sprout growth control was needed for storage periods <3 months at 22°. Suberization occurred during curing at 22°, but the suberin layer did not completely protect the cut surface. Chemical name used: isopropyl n-(3 chlorophenyl)-carbamate (CIPC).

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Gene E. Lester and Michael A. Grusak

Commercially grown honey dew fruit [Cucumis melo (Inodorus group)] typically are harvested before abscission because fruit cut unripe have a longer storage life than fully ripe fruit. However, because fully ripe fruit contain higher concentrations of soluble solids (predominantly as sugars), an attribute that increases their preference among consumers, methods are being explored to extend the storage life of fully ripe fruit. In this study, fully abscised honey dew fruit were evaluated for tissue attributes and consumer preference following postharvest dipping in either chelated or nonchelated calcium (Ca) solutions. Calcium sources were an amino acid-chelated Ca, ethylene-diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-chelated Ca, or calcium chloride (CaCl2), with each provided at three different rates. Fruit were evaluated at harvest, and after 14 or 22 days commercial storage. Evaluations were peel surface changes (color and disorders), hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration, flesh firmness, soluble solids concentration, and consumer preference of the edible flesh. Peel color became yellowed and lighter during storage for all fruit, with higher Ca rates resulting in more intensely yellowed fruit. Hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration was 0.90 mg·g-1 of fresh weight (900 ppm) at harvest, and declined in all fruit by 22 days storage. Peel disorders (disease and spotting) were none to slight for all fruit by 14 days storage, but by 22 days storage disease incidence ranged from none to severe, depending on the Ca source and rate. Fruit firmness declined in all fruit throughout storage, with the smallest declines measured in fruit treated with the amino acid-chelated Ca. Soluble solids concentration of fully ripe fruit was 12.3% at harvest, and showed either no decline or slight declines with storage among the treatments. Consumer preference was highest for freshly harvested fruit, but fruit were desirable even after 22 days storage across all treatments. Postharvest application of Ca at ≤0.16 m Ca in an amino acid-chelated form, versus EDTA-chelated Ca or CaCl2, slowed honey dew melon senescence so that after 22 days of commercial and retail storage the fruit were of high marketable quality, and there was no detrimental effect on consumer preference for the edible flesh.

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Eric E. Roos and C.W. Vertucci

173 WORKSHOP 29 Seed Storage

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Steven A. Sargent, Adrian D. Berry, Jeffrey G. Williamson, and James W. Olmstead

compared with MH fruit using side–slapper finger harvest technology from that era; they reported that MH fruit were softer than HH fruit, resulting in significantly higher losses and increased decay during storage. Since then, several studies have evaluated

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A.P. Medlicott, J.M.M. Sigrist, and O. Sy

1 Current address: Fintrac Consulting Ltd., Hythe, Welches, Christchurch, Barbados, West Indies. Research supported by the Overseas Development Administration, England, commissioned project “Tropical and subtropical fruit storage and ripening”. The

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Xiaoming Wang, Changzhu Li, Shijun Tang, and Wei Tang

92 POSTER SESSION 10 (Abstr. 105–119) Postharvest Physiology/Storage/Food Science Tuesday, 25 July, 1:00–2:00 p.m.

Open access

Mohsen Hatami, Siamak Kalantari, Forouzandeh Soltani, and John C. Beaulieu

stages in dudaim melon during storage. Material and methods Planting and harvesting . Two cultivars of dudaim melon (Zangi-Abad and Kermanshah) were direct-seeded in a randomized complete block design at the Mohammad-Shahr Research Station (Karaj, Iran

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Susan Lurie and Joshua D. Klein

1 Dept. of Fruit and Vegetable Storage. 2 Dept. of Field Crops. This article is publication no. 3167-E, 1990 series, from the ARO, Bet Dagan, Israel. The research was funded in part by the United States-Israel Binational Agricultural

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W. Roland Leatherwood, John M. Dole, and James E. Faust

ethephon activity on stock plants and unrooted cuttings. We applied a range of ethephon concentrations and subsequent storage treatments to show how temperature and rinsing of cuttings may affect ethylene evolution. Materials and Methods Plant material