Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 743 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Open access

Dermot P. Coyne and Robert M. Hill

Abstract

A need exists for the introduction of a high quality, large fruited butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata Duch ex Poir) stable for fruit shape.

Open access

Dermot P. Coyne

Abstract

Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata Duch ex Poir.) is one of the most popular types of winter squash grown in the United States. Most Butternut squash is unstable for fruit shape and mutation to crookneck fruit occurs at a high frequency. Seed stocks need to be rogued frequently in order to keep the no. of crookneck and dimorphic plants at a low level. Two cultivars, small fruited ‘New Hampshire Butternut’ (NHBN) and large fruited ‘Waltham Butternut’, stable for fruit shape have been introduced. The fruit of the former cultivar is considered to be too small for general use. ‘Waltham Butternut’ has attractive fruit shape and high yield, but is considered to have a different flavor and texture than older butternut cultivars. The purpose of my breeding program was to develop a medium size butternut squash free of the crookneck rogue and with a flavor and texture similar to ‘Butternut 23’ (Asgrow Seed Co.).

Free access

R.W. Robinson and Stephen Reiners

Summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivars were compared for ability to set parthenocarpic fruit. Some cultivars set no parthenocarpic fruit and others varied in the amount of fruit set when not pollinated. The degree of parthenocarpy varied with season, but the relative ranking of cultivars for parthenocarpy was generally similar. Cultivars with the best parthenocarpic fruit set were of the dark green, zucchini type, but some cultivars of other fruit types also set parthenocarpic fruit. A summer squash cultivar was developed that combines a high rate of natural parthenocarpy with multiple disease resistance. Yield of summer squash plants grown under row covers that excluded pollinating insects was as much as 83% of that of insect-pollinated plants in the open.

Free access

Harry S. Paris and Aviva Hanan

Summer squash plants are monoecious, producing staminate and pistillate flowers. The flowers are borne at the stem nodes, more precisely at the leaf axils, the junctions of the stem with the bases of the leaf petioles. Staminate flowers

Free access

Qiubin Xiao and J. Brent Loy

. However, botanically, the term spine is correctly applied to woody outgrowths of stems representing modified plant organs ( Featherly, 1954 ). In summer squash ( Cucurbita pepo ), trichomes are an undesirable anatomic trait because they can cause extensive

Free access

Dario J. Chavez, Eileen A. Kabelka, and José X. Chaparro

species, with perennials or annuals plants ( Teppner, 2004 ). The most important cultivated species in the genus Cucurbita are C. pepo L. ‘summer squash’, C. maxima Duchesne ‘winter squash’, and C. moschata ‘winter and crookneck squash’, and of

Full access

Bielinski M. Santos, Camille E. Esmel, Silvia Slamova, and Elizabeth A. Golden

, summer squash, or muskmelon with strawberry. Reusing plastic mulches may increase cost-effectiveness while reducing environmental impact and the risk of economic failure during a year of low-market demand for a crop grown alone ( Brown et al., 1985

Free access

Charles Zachry Ogles, Joseph M. Kemble, Amy N. Wright, and Elizabeth A. Guertal

. Thus, the objective of the research was to evaluate the use of HFF as a source of organic N along with inorganic N sources at various rates in a plasticulture rotation of yellow squash ( Cucurbita pepo cv. Conqueror III) (Seminis Seed Co., St. Louis

Free access

Carol Gonsalves, Baodi Xue, and Dennis Gonsalves

1 Permanent address: Dept. of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural Univ., Nanjing 210014, People's Republic of China. We thank P. Chee for answering questions on squash regeneration, F. Klas for providing the

Free access

Kristen R. Hladun and Lynn S. Adler

hubbard squash ( Cucurbita maxima ) is an effective PTC for the main crop, butternut squash ( C. moschata ), because it is an attractive food source for a major cucurbit pest, the striped cucumber beetle ( Acalymma vittatum F.) ( Andersen and Metcalf