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M. Murshidul Hoque, Husein Ajwa, Mona Othman, Richard Smith, and Michael Cahn

conducted by the University of California–Davis, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (DANR), as described on the DANR web site: http://danranlab.ucanr.org . Agronomic and yield parameters. Romaine lettuce was harvested 78 d after

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Heidi B. Rader and Meriam G. Karlsson

A high tunnel environment was evaluated for production of leaf (`Two Star') and romaine (`Parris Island Cos') lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in a northern location (lat. 64°49'N). Ten plantings were made 1 week apart from May to August. Averaged over the season, the air temperature was 1.5 °C and the soil 0.8 °C higher in the high tunnel than the field. `Two Star' planted on 3 Aug. and harvested on 16 Sept. produced higher yield (P < 0.001) in the tunnel. Head weight was 195 ± 12 g in the tunnel and 99 ± 8 g in the field. For the 13 July-planted `Two Star' lettuce, the field produced significantly (P < 0.001) more at 202 ± 21 g/head than the 135 ± 29 g/head in the tunnel. The three consecutive field plantings of 1, 8, and 15 June resulted in higher `Parris Island Cos' yields than corresponding plantings in the high tunnel. Head weights for harvests on 11, 18, and 25 July were 457 ± 60, 476 ± 65, and 478 ± 25 g under field conditions and 354 ± 46, 331 ± 52, and 312 ± 14 g in the high tunnel. `Two Star' was observed less prone to bolting than `Parris Island Cos'. Although a high tunnel did not generally support increased productivity in this study, the added protection resulted in high quality lettuce with limited necessary preparation and marketing loss in comparison to the field-grown lettuce.

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Mark Scaroni and Jo Ann C. Wheatley

This project examined a floating row cover as an alternative to chemical use for pest control. Insect and vertebrate pest control was excellent on the covered versus the uncovered crop plants. Average weight, length, and quality were enhanced through the use of covers. The interval of transplant-to-harvest was also decreased. While the cost of row cover use is quite high on a per-acre basis, additional gains in quality, yields, earlier plantings, and earlier harvests may justify the use of row covers as an alternative to chemical control. Although acceptance and use of row covers may ultimately rely on the consumer, demand for organically grown vegetables will warrant further evaluation of row cover materials.

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Mark Scaroni and Jo Ann C. Wheatley

This project examined a floating row cover as an alternative to chemical use for pest control. Insect and vertebrate pest control was excellent on the covered versus the uncovered crop plants. Average weight, length, and quality were enhanced through the use of covers. The interval of transplant-to-harvest was also decreased. While the cost of row cover use is quite high on a per-acre basis, additional gains in quality, yields, earlier plantings, and earlier harvests may justify the use of row covers as an alternative to chemical control. Although acceptance and use of row covers may ultimately rely on the consumer, demand for organically grown vegetables will warrant further evaluation of row cover materials.

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Abbas Lafta and Beiquan Mou

-Summer, and Vanguard 75 ( Table 2 ). There was no significant correlation between field germination and germination at 29 or 34 °C among crisphead genotypes ( Table 7 ). Romaine lettuce. Germination percentage and germination rates for romaine lettuce

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Samuel S. Liu and Yong-Biao Liu

significantly in their sensitivities to CO 2 and ethylene ( Brecht et al., 1973 ; Cantwell and Suslow, 2001 ). In this study, we conducted low-temperature phosphine fumigation treatments of head and romaine lettuce with and without CO 2 and ethylene

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Ah-Chiou Lee, Fang-Shin Liao, and Hsiao-Feng Lo

temperature regimes on the quality of six commercial romaine lettuce cultivars with 22 field plantings over a 3-year period and were able to precisely predict yield and head quality. The accurate prediction of harvest dates would minimize economic losses for

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Rahmatallah Gheshm and Rebecca Nelson Brown

responds well to organic nutrient sources, and compost amendments have been shown to increase yields and quality of romaine lettuce relative to inorganic fertilizers ( Hernández et al., 2016 ). The use of organic mulches, particularly composts, may be an

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Theekshana C. Jayalath, George E. Boyhan, Elizabeth L. Little, Robert I. Tate, and Suzanne O’Connell

late spring organic lettuce production in Georgia. Objectives included a comparison of 1) butterhead and romaine lettuce yields grown under high tunnels and the field, 2) butterhead and romaine lettuce yields among three spring PDs, and 3