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Nadine Ledesma and Nobuo Sugiyama

This paper is a portion of a dissertation submitted as a requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 1 To whom reprint requests should be addressed. E-mail address: aledesma@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

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Virginia I. Lohr

Abstract

Several recent reports have been critical of the quality of general education in the United States (Assn, of American Colleges, 1985; Geiger, 1980; Schwerin, 1983). Baccalaureate education has not been spared from negative evaluation (Boyer, 1987). A report of the Assn, of American Colleges (1985) stated that the bachelor’s degree had lost its intrinsic value: undergraduate education was being dominated by a marketplace philosophy and universities were not promoting rigorous thinking.

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Paul Holford, Jann Conroy, Carolyn Webb, and Janne Malfroy

Research Philosophy and Methodology (RPM) is a core course designed for postgraduate students studying horticulture at the University of Western Sydney Hawkesbury. This course has two aims. First, RPM introduces the different paradigms found within science to students, and develops their understanding of different approaches to problem solving and extending knowledge. Second, RPM encourages an exploration of different forms of expression used within science and provides students with opportunities to practice communicating their ideas through written and oral presentations. It is intended that students will complete this course with a deeper understanding of how science is conducted and communicated.

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J.J. Ferguson

The experience and resources of extension specialists can be utilized in resident instruction within a horticultural managers' seminar for advanced undergraduate students, drawing on application of horticultural principles in work situations and other complex issues facing agricultural managers. Guest speakers present an overview of their background, work responsibilities, management philosophy and management practices. Students interact with speakers in this informal seminar and complete written evaluations of speakers and topics for discussion in later classes. This horticultural managers' seminar exposes students to the medley of problems and opportunities facing agricultural managers, utilizes the resources of extension faculty in resident instruction and reinforces ties between commodity departments and their respective industries.

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George Tereshkovich

Abstract

Paul Read’s recent article titled “Hiding Our Light Under a Bushel or Are Good Teachers of Horticulture Truly Scarce?” (1) inspired me to come out from underneath the bushel and discuss with you my philosophy on teaching. I really do not know what the qualifications of a good teacher are; perhaps some are natural-born teachers, whereas others become good teachers through experience, time, and tenure; while others profess to be good teachers but never reach that plateau. Perhaps a good teacher is a good communicator, possesses superior judgment, has knack, intuition, and a thorough understanding of horticulture or another discipline.

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Robert L. Carolus

Abstract

A growing uneasiness that the natural environment may be deteriorating is causing increasing numbers of intelligent concerned people, both young and old, to challenge scientific agricultural practices and embrace and promote the back to “nature” philosophy of the organic gardeners. The followers of the “organic” way condemn or prohibit the use of all manufactured agricultural chemicals and advocate the use of only certain “natural” products and biodegradable refuse in producing, and biological means in protecting their “organically” grown foods and ornamentals. If their practices were universally adopted, they contend, a more healthful abundant life in a less polluted environment would soon follow.

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Z. R. Sung, J. M. Smith, J. H. Choi, M. Krauss, C. Borkird, and L. -S. Liu

Abstract

The objective of our research is to understand the genetic basis of embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis from carrot culture was chosen as the experimental system because of its simplicity and the ease with which it lends itself to obtaining a large number of embryos for genetic and biochemical experiments. Our general philosophy is to avoid media manipulation and to focus on gene expression during embryogenesis. One approach is to isolate genes preferentially expressed at specific stages of embryogenesis, and then to study the role of these genes in development.

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Steven Doud and Greg Pagano

Abstract

Many American urban dwellers seem to be discovering a fact known to most of their European peers for many years: a garden can provide inexpensive, high quality food as well as recreation and relaxation. The green thumb boom has been particularly evident in the sprouting of community garden projects in many college communities where students are anxious to supplement meager incomes and opportunities to work with living plants. Community garden projects often feature considerable diversity in cultural management philosophy and work load allocation but share a common goal of abundant food production and enjoyment for the gardeners.

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Richard L. Lower

Abstract

The title of this presentation might well have been either: Publish, Perish, Patent, Profit or Genetic Engineering: An Achilles Heel for Agricultural Research (7). References to academia in this discussion are specific to or encompass only public or land-grant institutions unless mention is made of privately endowed schools. It might be appropriate to define the role of land-grant institutions and then attempt to see if we are measuring up to land-grant philosophies as the gap is bridged between the exciting new biotechnology areas and state agricultural experiment stations. It is the latter that employ most of us.

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Danielle R. Ellis and Kathryn C. Taylor

To whom reprint requests should be addressed, Email address: kctaylor@uga.edu This work is a portion of a dissertation submitted by D.R. Ellis as partial fulfillment of requirements for doctor of philosophy degree. This work was partially supported