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Richard L. Fery and Judy A. Thies

Greenhouse experiments determined the inheritance of resistance to the peanut root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne arenaria (Neal) Chitwood race 1] in Capsicum chinense Jacq. germplasm lines PA-353 and PA-426. Evaluation of parental, F1, F2, and backcross populations of the crosses PA-353 × PA-350 and PA-426 × PA-350 (PA-350 is a susceptible cultigen) indicated that resistance in both C. chinense germplasm lines was conditioned by a single dominant gene. Evaluation of the F1 × resistant parent backcross populations in the cytoplasm of their respective resistant and susceptible parents indicated that the cytoplasm of the resistant parent is not needed for full expression of resistance. Allelism tests indicated that the dominant resistance gene in both PA-353 and PA-426 is allelic to a resistance gene in C. annuum L. `Carolina Cayenne'. However, these allelism tests did not demonstrate conclusively that the M. arenaria race 1 resistance gene in C. chinense is the N gene that conditions resistance to the southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood] in C. annuum. The ease and reliability of evaluating plants for resistance to root-knot nematodes and the availability of simply inherited sources of resistance makes breeding for peanut root-knot nematode resistance a viable objective in C. chinense breeding programs.

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D. G. Mortley, J. Y. Lu, P. Grant, and G. W. Carver

The effect of periodic removal of peanut foliage for use as a green vegetable on final foliage and nut production was evaluated in a field experiment in the summer of 1992. Georgia Red peanut cultivar was grown in Norfolk sandy loam soil in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Treatments consisted of removing peanut foliage at 2, 4, and 6 weeks, starting six weeks after planting, and an untreated check. Fresh foliage yield declined an average of 30% while dry weight declined 34% when harvested at 2 and 4 weeks. Nut yield declined 33% when harvested at 2 and 4 weeks but yield decreased only 10% when harvested at 6 weeks. Peanut greens are highly nutritious especially as a rich source of vitamin C and protein. For good balance between foliage and nut production, it appears that harvest intervals should be after four weeks.

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R.L. Fery and J.A. Thies

The peanut root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria race 1) is potentially a major pest of pepper cultivars belonging to the species Capsicum chinense. Greenhouse tests were conducted to: 1) compare the level of resistance to the peanut root-knot nematode exhibited by the recently released C. chinense germplasm line PA-353 to that exhibited by the C. annuum cv. Carolina Cayenne; 2) to determine the inheritance of the resistance in the C. chinense germplasm line PA-353; and 3) to determine the genetic relationship between the resistance exhibited by the C. chinense germplasm line PA-353 and that exhibited by the C. annuum cv. Carolina Cayenne. The level of resistance exhibited by the C. chinense germplasm line PA-353 was equal to the high level of resistance of the C. annuum cv. Carolina Cayenne. Evaluation of parental, F1, F2, and backcross populations of the cross between the resistant C. chinense germplasm line PA-353 and the susceptible C. chinense accession PA-350 indicated that the resistance in C. chinense is conditioned by a single dominant gene. The F2 population of the interspecific cross between the resistant C. chinense germplasm line PA-353 and the resistant C. annuum cv. Carolina Cayenne did not segregate for resistance, indicating that the dominant resistance gene in C. chinense is likely allelic to or closely linked to a gene conditioning resistance in C. annuum. The availability of a simply inherited source of outstanding resistance makes breeding for peanut root-knot nematode resistance a viable objective in C. chinense breeding programs.

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D.G. Mortley, C.K. Bonsi, W.A. Hill, and C.E. Morris

`Georgia Red' peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) was grown hydroponically at 20/16 °C, 24/20 °C, 28/24 °C, and 32/28 °C, day/night air temperatures to evaluate effects on pod and seed yield, flowering, harvest index, and oil content. Ten-day-old peanut seedlings were transplanted into rectangular nutrient film technique troughs (0.15 × 0.15 × 1.2 m) and grown for 110 days. Growth chamber conditions were as follows: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) mean of 436 μmol·m-2·s-1, 12 h light/12 h dark cycle, and 70% ± 5% relative humidity. The nutrient solution used was a modified half-Hoagland with pH and electrical conductivity maintained between 6.5 to 6.7, and 1000 to 1300 μS·cm-1, respectively, and was replenished weekly. Vegetative growth (foliage, stem growth, total leaf area, and leaf number) was substantially greater at increasingly warmer temperatures. Reproductive growth was significantly influenced by temperature. Flowering was extremely sensitive to temperature as the process was delayed or severely restricted at 20/16 °C. The number of gynophores decreased with temperature and was virtually nonexistent at the lowest temperature. Pod yield increased with temperatures up to 28/24 °C but declined by 15% at the highest temperature (32/28 °C). Seed yield, maturity, and harvest index were highest at 28/24 °C. Oil content (percent crude fat) increased an average of 23% and was highest at the warmest temperature (32/28 °C). These results clearly suggest that vegetative and reproductive growth, as well as oil content of peanut in controlled environments, are best at warmer temperatures of 28/24 °C to 32/28 °C than at cooler temperatures of 20/16 °C to 24/20 °C.

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K. Stanciel, D.G. Mortley, D.R. Hileman, P.A. Loretan, C.K. Bonsi, and W.A. Hill

The effects of elevated CO2 on growth, pod, and seed yield, and gas exchange of `Georgia Red' peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) were evaluated under controlled environmental conditions. Plants were exposed to concentrations of 400 (ambient), 800, and 1200 μmol·mol–1 CO2 in reach-in growth chambers. Foliage fresh and dry weights increased with increased CO2 up to 800 μmol·mol–1, but declined at 1200 μmol·mol–1. The number and the fresh and dry weights of pods also increased with increasing CO2 concentration. However, the yield of immature pods was not significantly influenced by increased CO2. Total seed yield increased 33% from ambient to 800 μmol·mol–1 CO2, and 4% from 800 to 1200 μmol·mol–1 CO2. Harvest index increased with increasing CO2. Branch length increased while specific leaf area decreased linearly as CO2 increased from ambient to 1200 μmol·mol–1. Net photosynthetic rate was highest among plants grown at 800 μmol·mol–1. Stomatal conductance decreased with increased CO2. Carboxylation efficiency was similar among plants grown at 400 and 800 μmol·mol–1 and decreased at 1200 μmol·mol–1CO2. These results suggest that CO2 enrichment from 400 to 800 μmol·mol–1 had positive effects on peanut growth and yield, but above 800 μmol·mol–1 enrichment seed yield increased only marginally.

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Xenia Y. Wolff and Robert R. Coltman

`Waimanalo Long' eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), `Kahala' soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill], `Jumbo Virginia' peanut (Arachis hypogea L.), `Waimanalo Red' sweet potato [Ipomea batatas (L.) Lam.], and `Green Mignonette' semihead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were field-grown in two seasons at Waimanalo, Oahu, Hawaii, in the open sun and with four artificially produced levels of shade (30%, 47%, 63%, and 73%). Yields and vegetative growth of eggplant, soybean, peanut, and sweet potato decreased linearly with increasing shade levels. Compared to unshaded controls, yields of semihead lettuce increased significantly under 30% shade in Fall 1986. During Spring 1987, lettuce yields were reduced only slightly from unshaded levels by increasing shade up to 47%. Leaf areas of index leaves of eggplant, soybean, and lettuce were similar to unshaded controls as shade intensity increased, while leaf dry weight decreased under shade. By comparison, both leaf area and leaf dry weight of peanut index leaves decreased as shade increased. Leaf area and leaf dry weight of sweet potato did not respond to shading. The results indicate that, of the five crops studied, only lettuce can be grown successfully under lightly shaded conditions and still receive enough radiant energy for maximum photosynthesis and yields.

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Judy A. Thies and Amnon Levi

Root-knot nematodes [Meloidogyne arenaria (Neal) Chitwood, Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood, and Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitwood] are serious pests of watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai var. lanatus] in the southern United States and worldwide. Watermelon cultivars with resistance to any of these nematode pests are not available. Therefore, we evaluated all accessions of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad.(21) and Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai var. citroides (L.H. Bailey) Mansf.(88), and about 10% of C. lanatus var. lanatus (156) accessions from the U.S. Plant Introduction (PI) Citrullus germplasm collection for resistance to M. arenaria race 1 in greenhouse tests. Only one C. lanatus var. lanatus accession exhibited very low resistance [root gall index (GI) = 4.9] and 155 C. lanatus var. lanatus accessions were susceptible (GI ranged from 5.0 to 9.0, where 1 = no galls and 9 = ≥81% root system covered with galls). All C. colocynthis accessions were highly susceptible (GI range = 8.5 to 9.0). However, 20 of 88 C. lanatus var. citroides accessions were moderately resistant with a GI range of 3.1 to 4.0; overall GI range for the C. lanatus var. citroides accessions was 3.1 to 9.0. Resistance to M. arenaria race 1 identified in the C. lanatus var. citroides accessions was confirmed on a subset of accessions in a replicated greenhouse test. The results of our evaluations demonstrated that there is significant genetic variability within the U.S. PI Citrullus germplasm collection for resistance to M. arenaria race 1 and also identified C. lanatus var. citroides accessions as potential sources of resistance.

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Jose G. Franco, Stephen R. King, Joseph G. Masabni, and Astrid Volder

with monocultures; i.e., less complex systems. We also hypothesized that this reduction in weed biomass would be the result of increased leaf area and aboveground plant biomass intercepting solar radiation. The species used in this study were peanut

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M. Lenny Wells and Eric P. Prostko

throughout southern Georgia in which pecan trees growing in rows immediately adjacent to peanut fields developed hollow pecans. In-shell nut size and appearance was normal; however, the kernels failed to develop ( Fig. 1 ). Frequent observations in multiple

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Paige L. Herring, Abbey C. Noah, and Helen T. Kraus

photoperiod. Fig. 1. Dill roots at harvest (49 d after sowing). Substrates included swine lagoon compost (SLC) [15:85 (v/v) swine lagoon sludge:ground peanut hulls]; aged pine bark fines, peat, soil, perlite, and worm castings (OM); and conventional substrate