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Kathleen G. Haynes, Beverly A. Clevidence, David Rao, and Bryan T. Vinyard

nutritional sciences where they are under study for protection against an array of chronic diseases, including cataract, macular degeneration, heart disease, and cancer ( Mares-Perlman et al., 2002 ) and for preserving mental acuity ( Johnson et al., 2008

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Ivette Guzman, Krystal Vargas, Francisco Chacon, Calen McKenzie, and Paul W. Bosland

can enter the bloodstream and is crucial as the human macular pigment that protects human eyes from age-related macular degeneration ( Bernstein et al., 2016 ). The results of the 31 accessions proves that not all pigments with health benefits are

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Kathleen G. Haynes, Lincoln Zotarelli, Christian T. Christensen, and Stephanie Walker

diseases including cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Perhaps the clearest link between specific carotenoids and a health outcome is that for lutein/zeaxanthin and age-related macular degeneration ( Snodderly, 1995 ) and reduction of inflammation

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James L. Brewbaker

Australian studies of macular degeneration. Dry kernels are light in weight (11 to 15 g per 100 kernels) and a typical grower recommendation is ≈4 kg of seed per acre assuming 80% emergence. Their F1 hybrids ( brittle-1 ) average from 15 to 20 g per 100

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Dean A. Kopsell, J. Scott McElroy, Carl E. Sams, and David E. Kopsell

; Yeum and Russell, 2002 ). Dietary intake of carotenoids has been associated with reduced risk of lung cancer and chronic eye diseases, including cataract and age-related macular degeneration ( Johnson et al., 2000 ; Le Marchand et al., 1993 ). Studies

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Mark W. Farnham and Dean A. Kopsell

certain specific chronic ailments, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and age-related macular degeneration ( Giovannucci, 1999 ; Mayne, 1996 ). From a dietary standpoint, carotenoids are common examples of compounds classified as antioxidants. The

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Mark Lefsrud, Dean Kopsell, Carl Sams, Jim Wills, and A.J. Both

associated with reduced risk of lung cancer and chronic eye diseases such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration ( Ames et al., 1995 ; Landrum and Bone, 2001 ; Le Marchand et al., 1993 ; Semba and Dagnelie, 2003 ). Increasing the lutein and β

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Rahmatallah Gheshm and Rebecca Nelson Brown

, glaucoma, and macular degeneration ( Christodoulou et al., 2015 ). In southern Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, saffron is used to flavor everything from ice cream, yogurt, candy, and liquor to baked goods, curries, rice, pasta, meat, and seafood

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Dean A. Kopsell and Carl E. Sams

specific chronic ailments including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and age-related macular degeneration ( Giovannucci, 1999 ; Mayne, 1996 ). The most studied bioactive components in the Brassicas are the glucosinolates and their hydrolyzed isothiocyanates

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Hagai Yasuor, Alon Ben-Gal, Uri Yermiyahu, Elie Beit-Yannai, and Shabtai Cohen

antioxidants recognized as beneficial for preventing a broad range of cancers and cardiovascular diseases ( Byers and Perry, 1992 ). These antioxidant compounds are effective free radical scavengers and may be important for prevention of age-related macular