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Craig J. Frey, Xin Zhao, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Dustin M. Huff, and Zachary E. Black

. Polyethylene-covered high tunnel structures, also called hoop houses, can offer a moderate level of environmental protection in crop production and facilitate season extension ( Lamont, 2005 , 2009 ). Tomato is the most commonly grown crop in high tunnels

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Craig J. Frey, Xin Zhao, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Dustin M. Huff, and Zachary E. Black

production and trade. University of Florida IFAS EDIS publication FE1027. 13 Jan. 2019. < https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1027 > Healy, G.K. Emerson, B.J. Dawson, J.C. 2017 Tomato variety trials for productivity and quality in organic hoop house versus open field

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Madeline W. Olberg and Roberto G. Lopez

Due to the high cost associated with constructing and operating a greenhouse, many growers have begun using alternative, low-input methods for bedding plant production, such as unheated high tunnel and outdoor production. Previous research indicates that bedding plant production in unheated high tunnels may be suitable for cold-tolerant species, but flowering is delayed compared with greenhouse production. To our knowledge, there has been no published research on the effects of outdoor production on bedding plant species. The objectives of this study were therefore to 1) compare the growth and development of 10 cold-tolerant and intermediate annual bedding plant species grown in an unheated high tunnel or in an unprotected outdoor growing area, 2) evaluate the effect of a 1-week acclimation period in the high tunnel before outdoor production, and 3) quantify the effectiveness of these production methods for producing high-quality bedding crops. Seedlings of ‘Antigua Orange’ african marigold (Tagetes erecta), ‘Hot Cakes White’ stock (Matthiola incana), and ‘Lilac Flame’ primula (Primula acaulis), and rooted cuttings of ‘Aloha Kona Hot Pink’ calibrachoa (Calibrachoa ×hybrida), ‘Royal Lavender’ regal geranium (Pelargonium ×domesticum), ‘Bella Oceano’ lobelia (Lobelia erinus), ‘Potunia Plus Red’ petunia (Petunia ×hybrida), ‘Phloxy Lady Purple’ phlox (Phlox maculata), ‘Summertime Pink Charme’ osteospermum (Osteospermum ecklonis), and ‘Empress Purple’ verbena (Verbena ×hybrida) were transplanted on 13 Apr. 2015 (week 16) into an unheated high tunnel or an outdoor growing area, or into an unheated high tunnel for a 1-week acclimation period before being moved outdoors. Average mean daily air temperature was 2.3 °C lower outdoors compared with inside the high tunnel, whereas average daily light integral (DLI) increased by 11.7 mol·m−2·d−1. All plants were delayed when grown outdoors compared with in the high tunnel, and all marigolds grown outdoors died in April when outdoor air temperatures dropped below −4 °C. When plants were acclimated for a 1-week period before outdoor production, all species, with the exception of regal geranium, were delayed by less than 1 week compared with those grown in the high tunnel. Stem length of all species grown outdoors was reduced or similar to those in the high tunnel, whereas biomass accumulation and branch number was unaffected or increased for most species. Overall, high-quality bedding plants could be grown outdoors, although development may be delayed compared with high tunnel production. Growers must be aware of the risk of crop loss due to extreme temperatures and plan for delays when growing annual bedding plant crops outdoors.

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Nicholas D. Warren, Rebecca G. Sideman, and Richard G. Smith

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) growers select cultivars based on a range of performance criteria. Currently, however, information regarding tomato cultivar performance in high tunnels is lacking. We conducted a tomato cultivar trial in an 1800-ft2 plastic-covered high tunnel in Durham, NH, with 15 indeterminate cultivars using organic fertilizers and pesticides. Tomatoes were grown in-ground in a randomized complete block design (n = 4) using raised beds with plastic mulch and drip irrigation. Marketable and unmarketable yield, several yield components, and susceptibility to two common diseases, leaf mold (Fulvia fulva) and powdery mildew (Oidium lycopersici or Leveillula taurica), were evaluated over a 3-year period. Differences between cultivars existed in all areas of interest, and year-to-year variation in performance was noteworthy in this experiment. ‘Geronimo’ consistently had among the highest yields, ‘Arbason’ and ‘Massada’ produced many individual fruit, and several cultivars including Rebelski, Massada, and Geronimo showed no signs of disease. Some cultivars such as Conestoga appeared susceptible to several different physiological disorders while others were relatively robust against this type of marketable yield reduction. Because we assessed multiple yield and quality variables and observed apparent trade-offs in several of these, we used radar plots to summarize and communicate the performance of each cultivar in an intuitive and comparable manner. Based on these data, several tomato cultivars appear particularly well suited for high tunnel production in northern New England.

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Gene A. Giacomelli

High tunnels are a special type of greenhouse with primary operational goals of season extension, crop quality improvement, and new crop production opportunities to reach unique markets. From an engineering viewpoint, high tunnels have many of the same design concerns as larger, more complex greenhouses. They capitalize on the greenhouse effect as do all enclosed plant growth structures. However, less automated environmental control systems are required for the desired crop production. Tunnel designs are less complex and less expensive than large high-technology greenhouse ranges, but they must be designed and constructed with the fundamental assurance of structural stability, safety, efficient layout, appropriate environmental control, and effective crop management in mind.

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W. Garrett Owen, Alyssa Hilligoss, and Roberto G. Lopez

Production and market value of U.S. grown specialty cut flowers has increased over the past several years due to stem quality issues related to long-distance transport, regional proximity to market centers, and consumer’s willingness to purchase locally. Cut flowers are traditionally grown in field or greenhouse environments; however, high tunnels provide an alternative production environment and a number of cultural and economic advantages. Specialty cut flower species ‘Campana Deep Blue’ bellflower (Campanula carpatica), bells of ireland (Moluccella laevis), ‘Bombay Firosa’ celosia (Celosia cristata), ‘Amazon Neon Purple’ dianthus (Dianthus barbatus), ‘Fireworks’ gomphrena (Gomphrena pulchella), ‘Vegmo Snowball Extra’ matricaria (Tanacetum parthenium), and ‘Potomac Lavender’ snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) were planted in both field and high tunnel environments during the late season (early summer) in the midwestern United States. Compared with field production, high tunnel production yielded 9.1 stems/m2 (75%) for bells of ireland and 9.5 cm (15%), 16.8 cm (16%), 6.7 cm (44%), and 6.3 cm (19%) longer stems for bells of ireland, celosia, gomphrena, and matricaria, respectively. Additionally, stem length and caliper was greatest for high tunnel–grown bells of ireland, celosia, and dianthus. Our results indicate that late-season planting and production in a high tunnel is suitable for most of the species we investigated.

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Şemsettin Kulaç, Pascal Nzokou, Deniz Guney, Bert Michael Cregg, and Ibrahim Turna

. Material and Methods The study was conducted in four hoop houses running east to west at the Tree Research Center (lat. 42.65° N, long. 84.42° W) on the campus of Michigan State University. The hoop houses were designed to keep rain from falling directly on

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Emmanuel Alves Dos Santos Hecher, Constance L. Falk, Juliette Enfield, Steven J. Guldan, and Mark E. Uchanski

Often called hoop houses, high tunnels are constructed by stretching a layer of polyethylene plastic over hoops of metal or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Most high tunnels rely on passive ventilation through roll-up sides, large doors, or removable end

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Desire Djidonou and Daniel I. Leskovar

commercially grown lettuce cultivars in response to N concentrations during three consecutive production seasons in an NFT hydroponic system. Materials and Methods Plant source and seedling production. The study was carried out in an unheated hoop house located

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Christopher J. Currey, Roberto G. Lopez, and Neil S. Mattson

Energy accounts for one of the largest costs in commercial greenhouse (GH) production of annual bedding plants. Therefore, many bedding plant producers are searching for energy efficient production methods. Our objectives were to quantify the impact of growing annual bedding plants in an unheated high tunnel (HT) compared with a traditional heated GH environment at two northern latitudes. Ten popular bedding plants [angelonia (Angelonia angustifolia), vinca (Catharanthus roseus), celosia (Celosia argentea), dianthus (Dianthus chinensis), geranium (Pelargonium ×hortorum), petunia (Petunia ×hybrida), french marigold (Tagetes patula), viola (Viola ×cornuta), snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus), and osteospermum (Osteospermum ecklonis)] were grown both in an unheated HT and a glass-glazed GH with an 18 °C temperature set point beginning on 1 Apr. 2011 at both Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) and Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN). Although seven of the species exhibited a delay in flowering in the HT as compared with the heated GH, there were no differences in days to flower (DTF) for geranium, osteospermum, and viola grown at Cornell and viola at Purdue. The remaining species exhibited delays in flowering in the HT environment, which varied based on species. At Purdue, several species were lost because of a cold temperature event necessitating a second planting. For the second planting, osteospermum was the only species grown that flowered significantly later in the HT; 7 days later than the GH-grown plants. Production of cold-tolerant annuals in unheated or minimally heated HTs appears to be a viable alternative for commercial producers aiming to reduce energy costs.