Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 193 items for :

  • "Vaccinium macrocarpon" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

Brett Suhayda, Carolyn J. DeMoranville, Hilary A. Sandler, Wesley R. Autio, and Justine E. Vanden Heuvel

in three cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) cultivars HortScience 28 447 (Abstr.). U.S. Department of Agriculture 2008 Massachusetts and Maine cranberries 25 Jan. 2008. 15 May 2008 < http

Free access

Jennifer Johnson-Cicalese, James J. Polashock, Josh A. Honig, Jennifer Vaiciunas, Daniel L. Ward, and Nicholi Vorsa

cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae) Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 123 41 47 Byrne, D.H. 2012 Trends in fruit breeding, p. 3–36. In: M.L. Badenes and D.H. Byrne (eds.). Fruit breeding. Springer, New York, NY California Office of Environmental Health

Open access

Eric G. Stone

Abstract

Seeds of 4 cranberry lines (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) stored for 9 months at 2–5°C germinated similarly on media of sand, sphagnum peat, and 1:1 sand-peat mixture under greenhouse mist. Differences among selections were attributed to dormancy.

Free access

Lisa Wasko DeVetter, Rebecca Harbut, and Jed Colquhoun

Fruit Var. J. 32 58 60 Eck, P. 1990 The american cranberry. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ Elle, E. 1996 Reproductive trade-offs in genetically distinct clones of Vaccinium macrocarpon , the american cranberry Oecologia 107 61 70 10.1007/BF

Free access

Ricardo Cesped-Ruiz* and Bingru Huang

The American cranberry often undergoes drought stress during the summer. However, the physiological response of this species to drought is not well understood. This study was designed to determine the effects of drought on two commercial cranberry cultivars of high potential yield, `Ben Lear' and `Stevens', during a vegetative stage. The plants were subjected to drought for 15 days in a greenhouse. Soil water content, leaf water content, leaf photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration, differential leaf-air temperature, photochemical efficiency (Fv'/Fm') and the actual PSII efficiency (deltaF/Fm') decreased in those plants subjected to drought. Drought reduced differential leaf-air temperature at day 6 of treatment and stomatal conductance and transpiration starting at day 9 and photosynthetic rate at day 13. Drought decreased leaf water content at day 14 and Fv'/Fm' and PSII efficiency at day 15. Our results indicated that cranberry plants in vegetative stage were sensitive to drought for both cultivars and stomatal conductance was the most sensitive parameter among those examined for both cultivars.

Open access

David H. Lees and F. J. Francis

Abstract

The effectiveness of gamma radiation as an enhancer of anthocyanin and flavonol pigment synthesis in cranberries was determined. Three different maturities of cranberries, based on their degree of coloration, and radiation levels of 150 and 300 krad were employed. The changes in the anthocyanin and flavonol pigments were measured quantitatively at regular intervals during storage. Radiation had a beneficial effect on the pigmentation of full-red cranberries and resulted in a significant increase in the anthocyanin and flavonol pigment contents. Effects on the less colored berries were not as great and in some cases flavonoid synthesis was reduced. The radiation induced changes were strictly quantitative in nature and there were no qualitative changes in the anthocyanins and flavonols. The visual effects of radiation on cranberries were minor softening and a stimulation of pigment production in the endocarp area of the fruit, resulting in internal coloration of the fruit. It was concluded that gamma radiation has an effect on the biosynthesis of the pigments involved and that the maturity stage of the cranberries was the controlling factor in determining the degree of response to radiation treatment. A possible mode of action of radiation on flavonoid synthesis was postulated.

Open access

Robert M. Devlin and I. E. Demoranville

Abstract

2-Chloro-2, ‘6’-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide (alachlor), 4-chloro-5-(dimethylamino)-2-(α,α,α-trifluro-m-tolyl)-3 (2H) pyridazinone (SAN-6706), and 4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(α,α,α-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H)-pyridazinone (SAN-9789) were applied to ‘Early Black’ cranberry vines in the spring at rates of 8, 12, and 16 lb. active ingredient/acre. No phytotoxicity on vine growth or appearance was detected in the alachlor plots or in plots receiving lower rates (8 and 12 lb./acre) of SAN-6706 and SAN-9789 but the higher rate caused a temporary chlorosis at the base of the cranberry leaf blade. No significant differences were detected between untreated and treated berries in respect to yield and berry size, dry wt, pectin content, and anthocyanin development.

Open access

Denny C. Davis and Azmi Y. Shawa

Abstract

Commercial harvesters of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) caused more berry injury than did a hand scoop. On the Furford Picker-Pruner the major berry injury occurs as the first elevator paddle contacts the berries. Modifications of the elevator on the Furford harvester significantly reduced cranberry harvesting injury on the elevator. Cranberry breakdown during a 5-week storage period was related to the prestorage berry injury level, but cranberry breakdown during an 8-week storage period was unrelated to injury level.

Open access

L. M. Massey Jr., B. R. Chase, and M. S. Starr

Abstract

Impact induced bruising of cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) predisposes the fruit to physiological breakdown often without showing external symptoms of impact for many hours. Impacts also induce marked and long lasting stimulation of C02 evolution almost immediately following its occurrence. This casual response relationship may be of value as an early sign of bruising in cranberries or other fruits and vegetables which are slow to show definite symptoms of rough handling.