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Phillip A. Wadl, Timothy A. Rinehart, Adam J. Dattilo, Mark Pistrang, Lisa M. Vito, Ryan Milstead, and Robert N. Trigiano

100% of the transplants had died. The reasons for the experimental failures were not entirely clear, but the investigators recognized the potential for drought stress and soil disturbance to negatively impact reintroduced plants. Although the relative

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of Florida strawberries. This study also observed that the types of foliar diseases which may be introduced on transplants varies with plant source region. FIELD-GENERATED SOIL-WATER CHARACTERISTIC CURVES FOR TROPICAL ORCHARDS IN

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Cameron Northcutt, Daniel Davies, Ron Gagliardo, Kylie Bucalo, Ron O. Determann, Jennifer M. Cruse-Sanders, and Gerald S. Pullman

The genus Sarracenia forms a group of carnivorous pitcher plants found mainly in North America. Pitcher plants are found in bog environments throughout the United States, usually in areas of slow-moving water where the acidic soil is poor in

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Menahem Edelstein, Daniel Berstein, Moshe Shenker, Hasan Azaizeh, and Meni Ben-Hur

soil columns and ground water contamination prediction Hydrol. Processes 22 2475 2483 Ohlendorf, H.M. Hoffman, D.J. Saiki, M.K. Aldrich, T.W. 1986 Embryotic mortality and abnormalities of aquatic birds—apparent impacts of selenium from irrigation

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Yukari Murakami, Yoshihiko Ozaki, and Hidemi Izumi

Chryseobacterium . Because potential sources of microbial contamination for persimmon fruit during growing and harvesting are from soil, agricultural water, pesticide solution, and packing-shed equipment ( Izumi et al., 2008a , 2008b ), the difference in field and

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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Vasile Cerven, Charles L. Cantrell, Wayne M. Ebelhar, and Thomas Horgan

), latitude and growing conditions ( Topalov, 1962 ), soil contamination ( Zheljazkov et al., 2006 ; Zheljazkov and Nielsen, 1996 ), soil amendments ( Zheljazkov, 2005 ; Zheljazkov and Warman, 2004 ), and agronomic practices such as harvest stage ( Clark and

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Tim R. Pannkuk, Jacqueline A. Aitkenhead-Peterson, Kurt Steinke, James C. Thomas, David R. Chalmers, and Richard H. White

Excessive losses of nitrogen (N), orthophosphate (P), and DOC from soil by leaching is indicative of breaks in their respective nutrient cycles. Losses of these nutrients are typically caused by management practices or natural disturbances in the

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Brad Geary, Corey Ransom, Brad Brown, Dennis Atkinson, and Saad Hafez

-planted onions. Although metam sodium is considered as a possible alternative to methyl bromide (a soil fumigant implicated in ozone depletion and scheduled for phase-out of commercial agriculture), it has its own limitations. Metam sodium is considered to pose a

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inefficiencies and contamination of soil and groundwater. Ribeiro et al. (p. 231) proposed and evaluated methodology to assess performance, thus enabling troubleshooting and technical adjustments of subirrigation systems. In a case study involving eucalyptus

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Marc W. van Iersel, Matthew Chappell, and John D. Lea-Cox

requirements can provide objective information to improve irrigation management. Sensing environmental and soil/substrate conditions is becoming easier and economically feasible, providing opportunities to integrate such sensors into existing irrigation systems