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Derald Harp, Gaye Hammond, David C. Zlesak, Greg Church, Mark Chamblee, and Steve George

hardy landscape plants that survive with minimal amounts of water and fertilizer, are pest- and disease-resistant, and provide beauty with very low additional input. Second, Earth-Kind ® landscape beds are prepared and maintained using organic composts

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Rob Kuper

—red. Identifying objective measures of perceptual and categorical colors and determining whether either affects landscape preference carries practical implications. Plant growers, scientists, designers, and installers can benefit from understanding and predicting

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Amy L. Shober, Kimberly A. Moore, Gitta S. Hasing, Christine Wiese, Geoffrey C. Denny, and Gary W. Knox

The University of Florida-Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF-IFAS) Florida Friendly Landscaping™ Program (FFL) provides general N fertilizer recommendations for ornamental landscape plants that range from 0 to 6 lb/1000 ft 2 of N

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Amy L. Shober, Kimberly A. Moore, Christine Wiese, S. Michele Scheiber, Edward F. Gilman, Maria Paz, Meghan M. Brennan, and Sudeep Vyapari

Container-grown woody ornamental plants may not develop sufficient root systems to compensate for evapotranspiration losses if not properly irrigated during establishment in the landscape ( Barnett, 1986 ; Gilman et al., 1996 ; Montegue et al

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Gitta Shurberg, Amy L. Shober, Christine Wiese, Geoffrey Denny, Gary W. Knox, Kimberly A. Moore, and Mihai C. Giurcanu

may over apply fertilizers in an attempt to attain aesthetically pleasing landscapes ( Israel and Knox, 2001 ). Targeted fertilization of urban landscape plants based on plant nitrogen requirements could reduce the likelihood of over fertilization and

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Christine L. Wiese, Amy L. Shober, Edward F. Gilman, Maria Paz, Kimberly A. Moore, Sloane M. Scheiber, Meghan M. Brennan, and Sudeep Vyapari

particular has been restricted throughout the United States ( Salamone, 2002 ; Thayer, 1982 ). Some water management districts restrict irrigation for establishing landscape plants to the first 60 d after planting. Research suggests, however, that woody

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S.M. Scheiber, David Sandrock, Erin Alvarez, and Meghan M. Brennan

As of 2003, 153 million people, 53% of the United States population, lived in the nation's 673 coastal counties ( Crossett et al., 2004 ). As development increases, landscape plants that tolerate coastal conditions become critically important to the

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A.L. Shober, K.A. Moore, C. Wiese, S.M. Scheiber, E.F. Gilman, and M. Paz

Urban population growth and periodic droughts throughout much of the United States have led to increased restrictions on landscape water use. These water restrictions have increased interest in planting native shrub species because natives are often

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Derald Harp, Gaye Hammond, David C. Zlesak, Greg Church, Mark Chamblee, and Steve George

&M AgriLife Extension Service evaluated roses once monthly during the growing season (April–October, except Apr. 2009) for 1) landscape performance; 2) bloom number; 3) percent bloom coverage, defined as the estimated percentage of the plant canopy covered in

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Tim R. Pannkuk, Jacqueline A. Aitkenhead-Peterson, Kurt Steinke, James C. Thomas, David R. Chalmers, and Richard H. White

caused by leaching. For example, one way of minimizing groundwater contamination by nitrate is by maintaining a vigorous turfgrass cover ( Jiang et al., 2000 ). Landscape plants not only provide aesthetic appeal and improve groundwater recharge in urban