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Wenjing Guan, Xin Zhao, Danielle D. Treadwell, Michael R. Alligood, Donald J. Huber, and Nicholas S. Dufault

., 2010 ). The most commonly cultivated melon type in the United States is cantaloupe (Reticulatus group) ( Sargent and Maynard, 2009 ). In 2011, 72,690 acres of cantaloupe were planted in the United States with a production value of $350 million [ U

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Diánez Fernando, Santos Milagrosa, Carretero Francisco, and Marín Francisco

parameters of a Cantaloupe- (Charentais) type melon crop ( Cucumis melo L. cv. Gandalf) under greenhouse. Materials and Methods Isolates of T. saturnisporum used in experiments Two isolates of T. saturnisporum (T1 and T2) were selected for their known

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M. S. Reid, T. H. Lee, H. K. Pratt, and C. O. Chichester

Abstract

Growth, respiration, and ethylene production patterns of ‘Crenshaw’ and ‘Persian’ cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) were similar to patterns previously established for cantaloupe (‘PMR 45’). From 3 weeks after anthesis the carotenoid content of the pulp of all 3 cultivars steadily increased from the low level characteristic of green tissue. Chlorophyll content decreased throughout the development of the fruits, but in the cantaloupe and ‘Crenshaw’ there was a final loss of chlorophyll during ripening.

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Bhimanagouda S. Patil, Kevin Crosby, David Byrne, and Kendal Hirschi

that cantaloupe and honeydew melons are potentially good sources of vitamin C and beta-carotene but do not address potential variation in these compounds across cultivars or horticultural groups ( Adams and Richardson, 1981 ). Variation in beta

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David W. Wolff and James R. Dunlap

Cucumis melo varieties show a great diversity of ripening and abscission phenotype, ethylene production, and postharvest keeping quality. As a preliminary step in the development of melons with improved shelf-life and modified ripening, we surveyed 100 genotypes of melons with diverse ripening characteristics for ethylene production rate and shelf-life. Genotypes representing seven melon types (Western shipper cantaloupes, Eastern cantaloupes, Long shelf life cantaloupes [LSL], Charenteis, Galias, Honeydews, Casabas) were planted in the field in a randomized complete block with three replications. C. melo var. reticulatus and C. melo var. inodorus were harvested 40 and 50 days post-anthesis, respectively, and brought in the lab for ethylene production measurement. Fruit at horticultural maturity were also harvested and stored at room temperature. After 7 days, a postharvest decay rating (1 = complete rot and collapse–5 = no softening or decay) was taken to determine relative shelf-life of the genotypes. Average ethylene production rate ranged from 44.44 to 0.64 nl·h–1·g–1 for Eastern cantaloupes and Casaba melons, respectively. A negative linear relationship was observed between ethylene production rate and postharvest decay rating. LSL cantaloupes had the lowest ethylene production rate of the netted, orange flesh types. The relationship between ethylene production rate and polymorphism for ACC oxidase (pMEL1) and ACC synthase (pMEACS1) cDNA probes is being investigated.

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Nancy E. Roe and Gerald C. Cornforth

In many areas, dairies and other concentrated animal operations must modify their waste handling systems. Utilization of locally produced manures by vegetable production operations may increase crop yields while preventing discharge of potentially polluting nutrients into waterways. Composting is often recommended to stabilize nutrients, lower the volume of manure, and produce a product that may control some plant diseases. However, composting has costs in time and equipment, so some growers prefer using uncomposted manure. Dairy manure compost at 22 (LC), 45 (MC), or 90 (HC) t·ha–1 or dairy lot scrapings at 45 t·ha–1 (FM) were tilled into soil before seeding a dryland cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) crop. All plots, including an unamended control (UC), were fertilized with a total of 23N–14P–0K (kg·ha–1). After removal of the cantaloupe in late summer, drip irrigation was added, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis Mill.) seedlings were transplanted into the identical plots, and 112N (kg·ha–1) was sidedressed. Cantaloupe yields from FM, LC, MC, HC, and UC plots were 5.4, 3.4, 2.1, 4.5, and 1.5 t·ha–1, respectively. Broccoli yields from FM, LC, MC, HC, and UC plots were 4.1, 3.6, 4.4, 4.1, and 2.2 t·ha–1, respectively. All rates of compost or manure increased yields of cantaloupe, and the subsequent broccoli crop. Use of the manure resulted in highest increase in potential net income from sales of cantaloupe and broccoli.

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Barbara D. Webster

Abstract

Anatomical changes which take place in conjunction with abscission of cantaloupe fruits (Cucumis melo L. cv. Powdery Mildew Resistant No. 45) include cell separation and cell collapse. Structural modifications in abscission zone cell walls are accompanied by histochemical changes which include losses of pectins and insoluble polysaccharides. Development of a separation cavity is consistently correlated with physiologically defined stages of fruit maturity, and the time of abscission coincides with the peak of the respiratory climacteric. Anatomical and histochemical changes similar to those in cantaloupe also take place in honeydew fruits (Cucumis melo L. cv. Honeydew). However, the abscission zone of honeydews is not structurally well defined, changes are limited to certain parenchyma cells, and the honeydew fruits do not normally abscise. It is suggested that the most desirable growth regulator for use on cantaloupes to accelerate and unify the time of fruit ripening would be one which did not coincidentally accelerate abscission.

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Wayne C. Porter

Clomazone was evaluated for reemergence weed control in summer squash, watermelon, cantaloupe, cucumber, and pumpkin. Clomazone was applied preplant incorporated or surface-applied after planting. All crops exhibited varying degrees of chlorosis in the cotyledonary stage and first one to three true leaves. Cucurbit tolerance to clomazone was pumpkin = squash > cucumber > watermelon > cantaloupe. Method of application did not affect crop vigor. Some pumpkin cultivars were more tolerant than others. Clomazone controlled Brachiaria platyphylla and Portulaca oleracea with both methods of application. Surface application provided better control of Amaranthus hybridus and A. spinosa. Mollugo verticillata was not controlled. Preplant incorporated application of clomazone tended to reduce the yield of watermelon.

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D. M. Hinton and R. Pressey

Abstract

β-1, 3-glucanase (laminarinase, EC 3.2.1.6) activity was detected in apples, asparagus, beets, cantaloupes, carrots, cherries, cucumbers, peaches, squash and tomatoes. During ripening in peaches and tomatoes, enzyme activities increased as fruit firmness decreased. Gel chromatography revealed that some of the extracts contained two β-1, 3-glucanases differing in molecular weight, pH optimum, and thermostability.

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Hunter Johnson Jr. and Keith S. Mayberry

Abstract

Thirty-one cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) were evaluated for their response to foliar dusting sulfur applications. Most cultivars were highly resistant to sulfur injury. Resistance was variable among cantaloupe types (Reticulatus group); all winter melon types (Inodorus group) were resistant.