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Kimberly H. Krahl and William M. Randle

25 ORAL SESSION 7 (Abstr. 047-053) Floriculture: Breeding and Genetics

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held at the 91st ASHS Annual Meeting Corvallis, Ore. 8 Aug. 1994 sponsored by the Vegetable Breeding Working Group Genetics and Germplasm Working Group Fruit Breeding Working Group Ornamental Plant Breeding Working Group published by the American

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Adelheid R. Kuehnle, Fure-Chyi Chen, and Nellie Sugi

55 COLLOQUIUM 2 (Abstr. 995-999) Classical and Molecular Approaches to Breeding Horticultural Plants for Disease Resistance

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held at the 92nd ASHS Annual Meeting Montréal, Québec, Canada 30 July 1995 sponsored by the Fruit Breeding Working Group Viticulture and Small Fruits Working Group Ornamental Plant Breeding Working Group Vegetable Breeding Working Group Plant

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Dongyan Hu, Zuoshuang Zhang, Donglin Zhang, Qixiang Zhang, and Jianhua Li

State University, and Masami Yamaguchi, National Institute of Fruit Tree Science of Japan, for providing plant materials.

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John R. Stommel and Robert J. Griesbach

147 POSTER SESSION 16 (Abstr. 070-091) Genetics/Breeding/Biotechnology Wednesday, 26 July, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

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Geunhwa Jung

divided into three distinct sections for easy reference: 1) glossary of plant breeding, cytogenetics, and sciences; 2) important crop plants, weeds, ornamentals, industrial woody, and others of the world; and 3) schematic tables and figures of breeding and

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James N. Moore, Roy C. Rom, Stanley A. Brown, and Gerald L. Klingaman

Floriculture & Ornamentals

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Dongyan Hu, Donglin Zhang, Zuoshuang Zhang, Qixiang Zhang, and Jianhua Li

Ornamental peach [Prunuspersica (L.) Batsch.] is a well-known ornamental plant for the garden. However, the genetic relationship among ornamental peach cultivars is not clear, which limits further studies of its molecular systematics and breeding. A group of 16 taxa of ornamental peach, originated from Prunuspersica and Prunusdavidiana (Carr.) Franch., had been studied using AFLPs and ISSRs. A total of 243 useful markers between 75 to 500 base pairs were generated from six EcoRI/MseI AFLP primer combinations (ACC/CAT, AGG/CAT, ACT/CAT, ACC/CTC, AGG/CTC, and ACT/CTC). The average readable bands were 41 per primer combination. Among them, 84% of the bands were polymorphic markers. A total of 132 useful markers between 300 to 1400 base pairs were generated from 10 ISSR primers (UBC818, UBC825, UBC834, UBC855, UBC817, UBC868, UBC845, UBC899, UBC860, and UBC836). The mean reliable bands were 14 per primer. Among them, 62% of the bands were polymorphic markers. Both methods generated very similar phenograms with consistent clades. From these results we concluded that AFLP and ISSR analysis had a great potential to identify ornamental peach cultivars and estimate their phylogeny. The application of these molecular techniques may elucidate the hierarchy of ornamental peach taxa.

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Margaret R. Pooler*

The crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) is one of the most widely planted and beloved woody ornamental landscape plant in the Southern United States. With hundreds of named cultivars that offer the grower and gardener diverse combinations of flower color, growth habit, and bark characteristics, crapemyrtles are planted primarily for their spectacular bloom in mid to late summer. The crapemyrtle breeding program at the U.S. National Arboretum was started in the early 1960s, and has resulted in the release of 31 improved cultivars of L. indica, L. indica × L. fauriei, and most recently, hybrids between L. indica, L. fauriei, and L. limii. The development of these cultivars, with a focus on the newly released red-flowering cultivars `Arapaho' and `Cheyenne', will be the focus of this poster. Information on Lagerstroemia germplasm, historical perspective, and breeding methodology and goals will be presented.