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Anthony S. Aiello and William R. Graves

65 ORAL SESSION 14 (Abstr. 470–477) Characterization, Evaluation, Utilization–Landscape Plants

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Kim E. Hummer

65 ORAL SESSION 14 (Abstr. 470–477) Characterization, Evaluation, Utilization–Landscape Plants

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James A. Zwack, William R. Graves, and Alden M. Townsend

65 ORAL SESSION 14 (Abstr. 470–477) Characterization, Evaluation, Utilization–Landscape Plants

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Nina Bassuk and Peter Trowbridge

establishment combined with a thorough knowledge of woody plant identification and their use in the landscape. The student audience, primarily graduate and undergraduate students in landscape architecture, also includes students in horticulture and related

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Ariana Torres, Susan S. Barton, and Bridget K. Behe

.5%), deciduous shrubs (11.1%), and flowering bedding plants (10.8%). These were, generally, the most important products sold by all types of landscape companies. The least important products accounted for generally ≤5% of sales. When we compared the product mix

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Erin Alvarez, Sloane M. Scheiber, and David R. Sandrock

Oral Session 32—Ornamental/Landscape/Turf/Plant Breeding/Management 30 July 2006, 2:00–3:15 p.m. Oak Alley Moderator: Timothy Rinehart

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Rolston St. Hilaire, Michael A. Arnold, Don C. Wilkerson, Dale A. Devitt, Brian H. Hurd, Bruce J. Lesikar, Virginia I. Lohr, Chris A. Martin, Garry V. McDonald, Robert L. Morris, Dennis R. Pittenger, David A. Shaw, and David F. Zoldoske

urban landscape is impacted by landscape irrigation and water application technologies ( California Office of Water Use Efficiency, 2006 ), the relationship among people, plants, and water-efficient landscapes ( Balok and St. Hilaire, 2002 ; Lohr, 1991

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Jessica D. Lubell

recognized solution to the loss of invasive shrubs is the increased use of native shrubs for landscaping. A survey of 270 members of the CNLA found that growers strongly favored the promotion of native plants as a solution to the invasive plant problem

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Melinda Knuth, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Patricia T. Huddleston, and R. Thomas Fernandez

Markets are rarely homogeneous, and market segmentation can be a viable means of efficiently and profitably reaching different consumer groups. This is true for many products, including ornamental landscape plants. Although the reasons for

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Mary H. Meyer, Pamela J. Bennett, Barbara Fair, James E. Klett, Kimberly Moore, H. Brent Pemberton, Leonard Perry, Jane Rozum, Alan Shay, and Matthew D. Taylor

impact, plant form, and landscape impact at eight locations for national grass trials in 2012–15. We selected as many cultivars of switchgrass and little bluestem as were available in the trade and could be obtained in sufficient supply in 2012. In Spring