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Kirsten L. Lloyd, Donald D. Davis, Richard P. Marini, and Dennis R. Decoteau

grape ( Vitis vinifera ), potato ( Solanum tuberosum ), bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ), tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ), watermelon ( Citrullus lanatus ), and lettuce ( Lactuca sativa ) ( Booker et al., 2009 ; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2013

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Mark J. Bassett and Phillip N. Miklas

.E. Bachmair, A. Schweizer, D. 2003 Integration of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) linkage and chromosome maps Theor. Appl. Genet. 106 205 212

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Melike Cirak and James R. Myers

Snap bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ), the vegetable form of the common bean, is an important crop globally, with production of more than 1.8 million Mg in 2018 (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2021 ). In the United States

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Gerardine Mukeshimana, Amy L. Lasley, Wayne H. Loescher, and James D. Kelly

bean genotypes BeanCAP. 26 July 2013. < http://www.beancap.org/_pdf/Beancap_Field_trials.pdf > Comstock, J. Ehleringer, J. 1993 Stomata1 response to humidity in common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ): Implications for maximum transpiration rate, water

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Elisha Otieno Gogo, Mwanarusi Saidi, Jacob Mugwa Ochieng, Thibaud Martin, Vance Baird, and Mathieu Ngouajio

French bean [ Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the most important introduced vegetable crops in the socioeconomic farming systems of eastern Africa. It is a crop with great potential for addressing food insecurity, income generation, and poverty

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W. Mersie, T. Mebrahtu, and M. Rangappa

Plant introductions of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were grown from seed in a growth chamber and exposed to 0, at 0.6 μl·liter-1 for 2 hours. Plants were assessed for their response to O3 by evaluating percent leaf injury. Of the 410 introductions tested. 17 insensitive. 370 sensitive. and 23 highly sensitive plant introductions were identified.

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Rebecca Nelson Brown and Peter D. Ascher

The methods of Wall and York (1957) were used to measure cotyledon position in two populations of three species interspecific Phaseolus hybrids and in the single species cultivars and accessions of P. coccineus, P. acutifolius, and P. vulgaris used as parents. Cotyledon position was represented by the length of the epicotyl as a percentage of the total length of the seedling's stem from the first root initial to the base of the primary node. Progeny of interspecific crosses between P. coccineus and P. vulgaris have been shown to inherit the cotyledon position of the cytoplasmic parent. The objectives of this study were to determine if three species hybrids also inherited the cotyledon position of the cytoplasmic parent, and to determine if P. acutifolius could be distinguished from P. vulgaris by its cotyledon position. Results indicated that the cotyledon positions of the three species hybrids did not differ significantly from the cotyledon positions of cultivars of the species used as the cytoplasmic parent for both P. vulguris cytoplasm and P. coccineus cytoplasm. Further, the cotyledon position of the P. acutifolius accessions did differ significantly from the cotyledon positions of both the P. vulgaris cultivars and the three species hybrid with P. vulgaris cytoplasm. These results suggest that cotyledon position may indeed be a species-specific trait for Phaseolus in Lamprecht's sense of the term.

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Mei Guo, David A. Lightfoot, Machteld C. Mok, and David W. S. Mok

Interspecific hybridization between Phaseolus vulgaris and P. coccineus results in mature seeds or abnormal embryo formation depending on the direction of the cross. In addition, differential fertility and reversion to parental types occur in later progeny populations, accompanied by recurrence of various embryo types. Normal and abnormal embryos exhibited isozyme patterns resembling P. vulgaris and P. coccineus parents respectively, suggesting that developmental abnormalities may be associated with specific combinations of parental genes. RFLP between parental species was examined and probes were selected for analyses of F2 populations. Differential transmission of alleles occurred for some RFLP markers. Statistical analyses were applied to detect possible association between probes and abnormal developmental events. The high incidence of interspecific polymorphism will also facilitate the construction of a linkage map in Phaseolus.

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Mei Guo, David A. Lightfoot, Machteld C. Mok, and David W. S. Mok

Interspecific hybridization between Phaseolus vulgaris and P. coccineus results in mature seeds or abnormal embryo formation depending on the direction of the cross. In addition, differential fertility and reversion to parental types occur in later progeny populations, accompanied by recurrence of various embryo types. Normal and abnormal embryos exhibited isozyme patterns resembling P. vulgaris and P. coccineus parents respectively, suggesting that developmental abnormalities may be associated with specific combinations of parental genes. RFLP between parental species was examined and probes were selected for analyses of F2 populations. Differential transmission of alleles occurred for some RFLP markers. Statistical analyses were applied to detect possible association between probes and abnormal developmental events. The high incidence of interspecific polymorphism will also facilitate the construction of a linkage map in Phaseolus.

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Aref A. Abdul-Baki and John R. Teasdale

A 3-year study was conducted at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Md., to evaluate plant stand, growth, and yield of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars Carlo and Matador grown with conventional tillage (CT) or with no-tillage hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) (HV) mulch. Plant stand and dry mass of both cultivars in CT were similar to those in no-till HV. However, leaf area and yield with no-till HV were significantly higher than those with CT.