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Michael S. Reid, Richard Y. Evans, Linda L. Dodge, and Yoram Mor

Abstract

The presence of very low concentrations of ethylene had dramatic effects on the opening of cut flowers of rose (Rosa hybrida L.). Depending on cultivar, the rate of opening was unaffected (e.g., ‘Gold Rush’), accelerated (e.g., ‘Sterling Silver’), or inhibited (e.g., ‘Lovely Girl’). The K m for the inhibition of opening of ‘Lovely Girl’ by ethylene was 4 ppb. Flowers of some cultivars (e.g., ‘Royalty’) had an abnormal shape when opened in the presence of ethylene. The effects of exogenous ethylene could be overcome by pretreatment of the flowers with 0.5 μmol silver thiosulfate per stem. No phytotoxicity was observed in flowers treated with 2 μmol per stem. Examination of the kinetics of the ethylene/Ag+ interaction in inhibition of opening of ‘Lovely Girl’ flowers indicated that the Ag+/ethylene interaction was competitive.

Open access

N. Gorin, G. Staby, W. Klop, N. Tippet, and D. L. Leussing Jr.

Abstract

Various silver containing solutions were evaluated for their effectiveness in extending the life of cut carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus, L. ‘Improved White Sim’) by simple chemical tests of the solutions. Effective solutions formed an immediate white or yellow precipitate (AgI) when 3.0 ml of the solution reacted with 0.15 ml of 2.0 m KI solution, whereas no precipitate formed when reacted with 0.15 ml of 2.0 m NaCI solution. When no precipitate formed with KI, there was insufficient silver in the solution to extend flower life, and hence, no silver was detected in a combined stem and leaf sample or in the flower head (consisting of receptacle, pistil, bracts, calyx and petals). A precipitate forming with both KI and NaCI indicated that the solution contained silver but in the wrong formulation to extend life. Flowers treated with this solution had silver in the combined stems and leaves, but practically none in heads. When solutions were effective, more silver was detected in heads than in the stems and leaves combined.

Free access

Zhen Shu, Yimin Shi, Hongmei Qian, Yiwei Tao, and Dongqin Tang

were sensitive to ethylene. van Meeteren et al. (1995) reported the relationships between carbohydrate and vase life of Freesia flowers. Very little is known, however, about the respiration characteristics and the physiological metabolisms during

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John M. Dole, Frankie L. Fanelli, William C. Fonteno, Beth Harden, and Sylvia M. Blankenship

Optimum postharvest handling procedures were determined for Dahlia `Karma Thalia', Lupinusmutabilis ssp. cruickshankii`Sunrise', Papaver nudicaule `Temptress', and Rudbeckia`Indian Summer.' Dahlia harvested fully open had a vase life of 7–10 days in deionized (DI) water that was increased by 1.5–2 days using commercial holding solutions (Chrysal Professional 2 Processing Solution or Floralife Professional). Neither floral foam nor 0.1–1.0 ppm ethylene had any effect on vase life. One week of cold storage at 1 °C reduced vase life up to 2 days. The longest vase life, 12–13 days, was obtained when floral buds, showing a minimum of 50% color, were harvested at the breaking stage (one petal open) and placed in 2% or 4% sucrose or a commercial holding solution. Lupinus flowers held in DI water lasted 8–12 days; 1 week cold storage at 1 °C reduced vase life by 3 days. Florets and buds abscised or failed to open when exposed to ethylene; STS pretreatment prevented the effects of ethylene. Commercial holding solutions increased Papaver vase life to 7–8 days from 5.5 days for stems held in DI water. While stems could be cold stored for 1 week at 1 °C with no decrease in vase life, 2 weeks of cold storage reduced vase life. Flowers were not affected by foam or ethylene. Rudbeckia had a vase life of 27–37 days and no treatments extended vase life. Stems could be stored at 2 °C for up to 2 weeks and were not ethylene sensitive. Floral foam reduced the vase life over 50%, but still resulted in a 13-day vase life.

Open access

Will Healy and David Lang

Abstract

Vase life of Alstroemeria hybrida ‘Regina’ was longest in inflorescences with secondary and tertiary florets. The presence of additional florets on a cyme decreased the vase life of the primary floret. Maximum flower opening and normal coloration occurred when the primary florets were harvested at the “rolled petal stage”. Cutting Alstroemeria stems above the blanched portion of the stem before placement in water increased water uptake and vase life. When secondary florets were present, leaf removal did not decrease vase life.

Free access

Peitao Lü, Xinmin Huang, Hongmei Li, Jiping Liu, Shenggen He, Daryl C. Joyce, and Zhaoqi Zhang

Termination of vase life for cut flowers is characterized by wilting associated with an imbalance developing between water uptake through xylem conduits in stems and water loss through stomata and other structures on leaves and other organs. To

Free access

John M. Dole, Frankie L. Fanelli, William C. Fonteno, Beth Harden, and Sylvia M. Blankenship

Optimum postharvest handling procedures were determined for Linaria maroccana `Lace Violet', Trachelium`Jemmy Royal Purple', and Zinnia elegans `Benary's Giant Scarlet' and `Sungold.' A 24-hour 10% or 20% sucrose pulse increased the vase life of Linaria by 2–4 days, resulting in a vase life of 9 days as compared to 5 days for control flowers held in deionized (DI) water. Use of floral foam and cold storage at 1 °C for 1 week decreased vase life. Treatment with either 0.1 or 1.0 ppm ethylene had no effect. The use of a commercial holding solution (Floralife Professional or Chrysal Professional 2 Processing Solution) or 2% or 3% sucrose increased vase life 4–10 days. For cut Trachelium, ethylene caused florets to close entirely or stop opening; 1-MCP and STS prevented these ethylene effects. Stems tolerated 4 days of 1 °C storage, but 1 week or more of storage reduced the 14-day vase life of unstored flowers to 9 days. Stems in 2% or 4% sucrose had a longer vase life compared to DI water. While the use of floral foam was not detrimental when used with sucrose solutions, it reduced vase life when sucrose was not used. Zinnia stems could not be cold stored for 1 week at 1 °C due to loss of turgidity and cold damage. Stems stored dry at 5 °C regained turgidity and averaged a vase life of 14 days; however, petals remained slightly twisted and curled after being in the vase for several days. Treatment with ethylene had no effect. Floral foam reduced vase life to 9–10 days.

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Susan S. Han, Abraham H. Halevy, and Michael S. Reid

Vase life of individual flowers of cut brodiaea (Triteleia laxa Benth.) inflorescences ended 4 days after opening. Best vase life was achieved by harvesting inflorescences 1 to 2 days before anthesis of the first flower and holding them in a vase solution containing 2% sucrose and 200 ppm 8-hydroxyquinoline citrate (HQC). Such inflorescences had a display life of 12 days. Decreasing the pH of the vase solution or pulsing inflorescences with 10% sucrose for 16 hours did not increase their longevity. T. laxa flowers pretreated with 10% sucrose overnight could be stored for up to 2 weeks without significant reduction in vase life.

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José J.M. van der Meulen-Muisers and Joop C. van Oeveren

Nongenetic variation in cut flower longevity due to plant characteristics was investigated in whole inflorescences and individual flowers of Asiatic hybrid lilies (Lilium L.). To distinguish this variation from genetic variation, plant characteristics of five cultivars were varied by using bulbs of three significantly different weight classes per cultivar. Inflorescence longevity depended on total number of floral buds, number of buds opening and variation in bud length. Variation in individual flower longevity per cultivar appeared to be small, despite a larger number of buds per stem with increasing bulb weight. Plant characteristics caused only small nongenetic variation in individual flower longevity when compared to inflorescence longevity. Therefore, individual flower longevity appears to be the best criterion to discriminate among longevity levels for a lily breeding program.

Free access

William J. Martin and Dennis P. Stimart

On-plant floret longevity and cutflower postharvest longevity (PHL) of Antirrhinum majus L., snapdragon, were evaluated using inbreds P1 (16 day PHL) and P2 (6 day PHL), F1 (P1 × P2), F2 (F1 self-pollinated), F2 × F2 (among and within PHL categories: long, 17 to 25 days; middle, 9 days; and short, 2 to 3 days), and F3 families (F2 self-pollinated). F2 on-plant floret longevity and PHL correlated to later generation PHL. Prediction of progeny PHL from F2 × F2 matings appears feasible if genotypic value for PHL of F2 is known. Selection for PHL is best based on evaluation of multiple cutflowers per genotype. Significant additive and dominant genetic variance components contribute to PHL.