Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 110 items for :

  • "root to shoot ratio" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Vijaya Shukla, Yingmei Ma, and Emily Merewitz

35 d of growth ( Fig. 1B ). Tillering rate was not significantly affected by all PA treatments (only Spd 500 μM) or on all dates. We found no significant differences in root biomass, root-to-shoot ratio, or leaf length (data not shown). Fig. 1. ( A

Free access

Laura Elisa Acuña-Maldonado and Marvin P. Pritts

chromatic values of a ( P ≤ 0.001), b ( P ≤ 0.001) and L ( P ≤ 0.001). Expt. 2: Increasing carbon reserves. High CO 2 concentrations in fall increased root–to-shoot ratio (1.02 versus 1.45, P < 0.05), but total plant dry weight in Mar. 2002 was

Free access

Heidi Marie Wollaeger and Erik S. Runkle

specific R:B responses have varied among studies ( Goins et al., 1997 ; Kato et al., 2011 ; Yang et al., 2011 ). An R (peak = 660 nm) to B (peak = 450 nm) ratio of 8:1 produced sweetpotato ( Ipomoea batatas ) plants with the greatest root-to-shoot ratio

Full access

Manpreet Singh, Rupinder Kaur Saini, Sukhbir Singh, and Sat Pal Sharma

, decreased shoot length, increased root length, increased root density, and increased root-to-shoot ratio. A comprehensive review of DI strategies used for vegetable crops is lacking because past reviews were based on a limited number of specific studies

Free access

Yanjun Guo, Terri Starman, and Charles Hall

deficit could increase root to shoot ratio and support primary root growth by suppressing ethylene production ( Saab et al., 1990 ; Taiz et al., 2015 ). Reduction of root DW under water deficit environments was reported in other species such as rose

Full access

Yanjun Guo, Terri Starman, and Charles Hall

, heliotrope, carnation, crimson bottlebrush ( Callistemon citrinus ), geranium ( Pelargonium × hortorum ), impatiens, and oleander ( Nerium oleander ) were reported to have a higher root density or root-to-shoot ratio with lower SMC ( Álvarez et al., 2009

Free access

Emily B. Merewitz, Thomas Gianfagna, and Bingru Huang

, Loretteville, Canada). Subsequently, all plant biomass was dried in an 80 °C oven for 72 h for dry weight (DW) determination. Root-to-shoot ratio was calculated as the ratio of root DW to shoot DW that included all tissues of the whole plant. Relative water

Free access

Ana Fita, Belén Picó, Antonio J. Monforte, and Fernando Nuez

proportionally reduced vine biomass (82% VW compared with PS; Figs. 2 and 3 ). Root size was also reduced in SC, and despite the differences in plant size, the root-to-shoot ratio was similar in PS and in SC. In fact, we found proportional reductions in most

Free access

Dewayne L. Ingram, John M. Ruter, and Chris A. Martin

ixora ( Ingram et al., 1986a , 1986b ; Johnson and Ingram, 1984 ; Martin and Ingram, 1991b ). It has been well documented that supraoptimal RZT below those causing direct injury alter the root-to-shoot ratio. In most cases, the root:shoot decreased at

Free access

Jeb S. Fields, James S. Owen Jr., James E. Altland, Marc W. van Iersel, and Brian E. Jackson

foliar nutrition during the study, with no differences in N ( P = 0.265) and K ( P = 0.076) and a treatment effect on foliar P ( P = 0.031). Root to shoot ratio of dry weight (R:S) was then measured and used as an estimator of carbon allocation