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J.A. Beaver and A.F. Iezzoni

We acknowledge the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station's support of this research. We also thank Dr. Steve Krebs for his instruction on starch gel electrophoresis and inheritance mode theory. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in

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Rengong Meng and Chad Finn

We thank Corwin Willard (Oregon State University) for his instruction in the use of the flow cytometer; Kathiravetpilla Arumuganathan (University of Nebraska) and Maxine Thompson (Corvallis, Ore.) for their helpful advice in the early stages of this

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Mark J. Bassett

1 Professor. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station journal series no. R-04750. I thank Hallie Smith, Graphics Dept., Office of Instructional Resources, Univ. of Florida, for the illustrations. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part

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Mark J. Bassett

1 Professor. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station journal series no. R-04752. I thank Hallie Smith, Graphics Dept., Office of Instructional Resources, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, for making the illustrations in this paper. The cost of

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Mark J. Bassett

1 Professor. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station journal series R-04749. I thank Hallie Smith (formerly with the Graphics Dept., Office of Instructional Resources, Univ. of Florida, for drawing the illustrations. The cost of publishing this

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Mark J. Bassett

1 Professor. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station journal series R-05058. I thank Hallie Smith (formerly with the Graphics Dept., Office of Instructional Resources, Univ. of Florida) for drawing the illustrations. The cost of publishing this

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Jack E. Staub and Karl Braunschweig

A teaching module was developed for computer-aided instruction of mutation theory. The Hypercard-driven, Macintosh compatible module illustrates the concepts of: 1) Changes in allele frequency with mutation pressure; 2) Number of alleles maintained in populations, and; 3) The Neutrality Hypothesis. The concepts are integrated in an application by using a game format.

Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. Mutation pressure results in changes in allele frequency. Concept 1 illustrates the theoretical changes in allele frequency under pressure of reversible mutation. Mutation equilibrium is depicted as P=V/u+v; where v=mutation rates of allele A and u of allele a. The Infinite-Alleles Model of mutation is illustrated in Concept 2 and specifies characteristics of new mutations by F=1/4Nu+1, where F=fixation index and N=number in population. Concept 3 demonstrates the hypothesis that polymorphisms result from selectively neutral alleles maintained in a balance between mutation and random genetic drift.

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Jack E. Staub and Karl Braunschweig

A teaching module was developed for computer-aided instruction of mutation theory. The Hypercard-driven, Macintosh compatible module illustrates the concepts of: 1) Changes in allele frequency with mutation pressure; 2) Number of alleles maintained in populations, and; 3) The Neutrality Hypothesis. The concepts are integrated in an application by using a game format.

Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. Mutation pressure results in changes in allele frequency. Concept 1 illustrates the theoretical changes in allele frequency under pressure of reversible mutation. Mutation equilibrium is depicted as P=V/u+v; where v=mutation rates of allele A and u of allele a. The Infinite-Alleles Model of mutation is illustrated in Concept 2 and specifies characteristics of new mutations by F=1/4Nu+1, where F=fixation index and N=number in population. Concept 3 demonstrates the hypothesis that polymorphisms result from selectively neutral alleles maintained in a balance between mutation and random genetic drift.

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Jayne M. Zajicek and Christine D. Townsend

Placing the horticulture student on a path of professional development as a society-ready graduate for the 21st century takes more than technical knowledge. New types of team-oriented organizations are being created that were not even imagined a few years ago. To help empower students to survive in these organizations, the course “Leadership Perspectives in Horticulture” was created. This interdisciplinary course serves as a model for leadership skill instruction by incorporating the component of leadership development into a technical horticulture course. The objectives of this course are to provide academic and historical perspectives in technical horticulture issues, develop skills in leadership, problem solving, and team building, complete a theoretical study of specific leadership models, and blend theoretical leadership models with horticulture issues by completing a problem solving experience. An overview of the course in addition to changes in leadership behavior of students will be discussed.

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Douglas C Needham

Computer-based authoring tools, e.g. Macromedia Authorware©, allow one to produce interactive applications or computer-based training modules for horticulture teaching and extension. These applications are useful not only as presentation tools, but also as supplementary instruction, whereby a student can interact with an application at his/her own convenience and learning level. “Interactive Lessons for Introductory Horticulture©” is one example of an application used in OSU's HORT 1013: Principles of Horticultural Science course. Students are able to navigate to various topics by selecting chapters and topics within chapters. The information is not just presented, but rather acted upon by the student through movable objects, touch-sensitive areas, text, audio and video clips, etc. Student learning should be enhanced by the variety of stimuli and the ability to review an entire presentation or portion thereof at will.