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J Austin Gimondo, Christopher J. Currey, Darren H. Jarboe, Martin Gross, and William R. Graves

plants fertilized with wastewater-grown algal materials with those traits of plants fertilized with two commercially available fertilizers, a synthetic controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) and a bio-based wastewater treatment coproduct that supplied N in

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Jennifer H. Dennis, Roberto G. Lopez, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Chengyan Yue, and Benjamin L. Campbell

plastic pots (69.6%), use of controlled-release fertilizer (66.4%), composting plant waste (64.0%), conservation/efficiency of energy (55.2%), use of biological pest controls (44.0%), water conservation measures (44.0%), and use of organic fertilizers (41

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Dinesh Phuyal, Thiago Assis Rodrigues Nogueira, Arun D. Jani, Davie M. Kadyampakeni, Kelly T. Morgan, and Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi

rates for mature grapefruit trees in Florida ( Morgan and Kadyampakeni, 2020 ). Table 1. Nutrient application rates for controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) blends used in the study. Four micronutrient rates (a blend of B, Mn, and Zn) were used: 0, 1.5, 3

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Jonathan Foster, Stephanie Burnett, and Lois Stack

observed when 5.0 g·L −1 of controlled-release fertilizer was incorporated into substrates. Hartmann et al. (2011) reported that topdressing with 18N–2.6P–10K fertilizer increased root production in japanese privet ( Ligustrum japonicum ), but notes that

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Kaitlyn M. McBride, Richard J. Henny, Terri A. Mellich, and Jianjun Chen

intensity of 1255 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 . If plants were produced in 1.25-L pots, a nutritional regime of N at either 0.9 or 1.4 g per pot from a controlled-release fertilizer should be provided. Poorest plant quality ratings occurred at a N level of 0.4 g per pot

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Mohammed Z. Alam, Calvin Chong, Jennifer Llewellyn, and Glen P. Lumis

water use and runoff from container growing. In Ontario, controlled-release fertilizers (CRFs) are most commonly used to fertilize container-grown plants. CRF is commonly incorporated into the medium before potting or topdressed on the surface of the

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Kimberly Moore, Scott Greenhut, and Wagner Vendrame

)]. Before transplanting, a 15N–4.05P–9.96K controlled-release fertilizer (Osmocote Plus, 8–9 month Southern release; Scotts-Sierra Horticultural Products, Marysville, OH) was incorporated into each substrate at 0, 4.1, 5.9, or 8.3 oz/ft 3 . Three substrate

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Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

controlled-release fertilizer (Osmocote Plus formulated for 6-month release in Florida; ICL Specialty Fertilizers, Dublin, OH) was placed in a layer ≈8 cm below the surface of the substrate at rates of 0, 1, 2, or 4 g of fertilizer per liter of substrate (0

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Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

, Atlanta, GA)], sand [grain diameter 0.25–0.5 mm (Multi-Purpose Sand; Sakrete, Charlotte, NC)], or 50/50 (v/v) mix of topsoil and sand (hereafter “mix”). Pots were filled to a depth of about 8 cm, and 6 g of 15N–3.9P–10K controlled-release fertilizer

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Qiang Xiao, XiaoHui Fan, XiaoHui Ni, LiXia Li, GuoYuan Zou, and Bing Cao

fertilizers HortTechnology 6 128 131 Broschat, T.K. Moore, K.K. 2007 Release rates of ammonium-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, iron, and manganese from seven controlled-release fertilizers Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 38 843 850