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James E. Barrett and Terril A. Nell

Florida Agr. Expt. Sta. J. Ser., no. R-01440. The authors express appreciation for the technical assistance of Carolyn Bartuska and the donation of plant material by Natural Beauty of Florida. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed

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M. P. Kaczperski and A. M. Armitage

The effects of differing storage conditions prior to transplanting were examined for Salvia splendens `Red Hot Sally', Impatiens wallerana `Super Elfin White', Viola × wittrockiana `Universal Beaconsfield' and Petunia × hybrida `Supercascade Lilac'. Plug-grown seedlings were stored for 0, 1, 2 or 3 weeks at 5C or 10C and irradiance levels from incandescent bulbs at 0, 2 or 12 μmol s-1 m-2. A second group of plants were stored at 18C and irradiance from fluorescent bulbs at 105 μmol s-1 m-2 for the same time period. Temperature was more important than irradiance in maintaining plant quality over the storage period. Impatiens and salvia could be stored successfully for a minimum of 2 weeks at 5 or 10C with no appreciable loss of quality, petunia and pansy up to 3 weeks. Seedlings of all species showed diminished quality when stored longer than 1 week at 18C. After storage, petunias stored at 18C flowered sooner than those stored at 5 or 10C. However, these plants were single stemmed, with long internodes and few flowers while those plants stored at 5 or 10C developed multiple branching and a short, compact growth habit at flowering.

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Paul A. Thomas and Joyce G. Latimer

66 ORAL SESSION 15 (Abstr. 478–484) Plant Growth Regulators/Marketing–Floriculture/Foliage

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M.P. Kaczperski and A.M. Armitage

We thank Ball Seed Co. for supplying plant material for this project. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement

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Joyce G. Latimer and Ronald D. Oetting

During greenhouse production in Spring 1995, conditioning treatments were applied to columbine (Aquilegia×hybrida Sims `McKana Giants'), New Guinea impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri Bull. `Antares'), marigold (Tagetes erecta L. `Little Devil Mix') and ageratum (Ageratum houstonianum Mill. `Blue Puffs') plants. Treatments included: mechanical conditioning (brushing 40 strokes twice daily); moisture stress conditioning (MSC) (wilting for ≈2 hours per day); undisturbed ebb-and-flow irrigation; overhead irrigation; high (500 mg·L-1 N) or low (50 mg·L-1 N) 3×/week N fertilizer regimes; daminozide (5000 mg·L-1); or paclobutrazol (30, 45, or 180 mg·L-1). One week after initiation of treatments, individual plants in separate greenhouses were inoculated with two adult green peach aphids (Myzus persicae Sulzer) or five two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch). A natural infestation of western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) in the mite-inoculated greenhouse provided an additional insect treatment. Brushing was the only treatment that consistently reduced thrips and mite populations. Aphid populations were lower on low-N than on high-N plants, but thrips and mite populations were not consistently affected by plant fertilization. Moisture stress conditioning tended to increase aphid populations on New Guinea impatiens and marigold, but had little effect on spider mite or thrips populations. Ebb-and-flow irrigation reduced the mite population on ageratum relative to that on overhead irrigated (control) plants. Plant growth regulators did not consistently affect pest populations. Chemical names used: butane-dioic acid mono(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide); β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Cynthia B. McKenney and Marihelen Kamp-Glass

The effectiveness of antitranspirant type and concentration on the leaf water relations of Saliva splendens F. `Firebird and Petunia × hybrida Juss. `Comanche'. Two film-forming antitranspirants, Cloud Cover and Folicote, were tested at three different concentrations in two different environments. The leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, and relative water content were evaluated. Transpiration per unit vapor pressure deficit and stomatal conductance for both crops decrease slightly but there was no trend with respect to the film type, environment or concentration rate. The leaf water potentials and relative water content did not show significant difference after antitranspirant application. In order for antitranspirant application to be of benefit to the growth of herbaceous plants, a more durable coating that remains semipermeable would have to be utilized.

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Joyce G. Latimer and Ronald D. Oetting

Two weeks after planting, plugs of New Guinea impatiens (Impatiens × hybrida), marigold (Tagetes erecta), or ageratum (Ageratum Houstonianum) were subjected to eight conditioning treatments: untreated, low N (50 ppm), high N (500 ppm), ebb/flow watering, drought, brushing (40 strokes twice daily), daminozide (5000 ppm), or paclobutrazol (45 ppm). Fertilizers were applied three times per week at 250 ppm N for all plants not treated with high or low N. Five adult twospotted spider mites were placed on each plant 1 week after treatment. New Guinea impatiens height was reduced by low N, brushing, or paclobutrazol at 4 weeks after treatment. Spider mite populations were reduced only by brushing. Marigold height was reduced by low N, drought, or brushing, but spider mite counts were reduced by brushing or paclobutrazol. Height of ageratum was reduced by low N, daminozide, or paclobutrazol, but spider mite counts were reduced by ebb/flow or brushing at 4 weeks after treatment.

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Jonathan M. Frantz, James C. Locke, Dharmalingam S. Pitchay, and Charles R. Krause

We thank Tera McDowell, Sarah Lancianese, Stephen Ohene-Larbi, Douglas Sturtz, and Leona Horst for their technical assistance throughout the studies, the Paul Ecke Ranch, Ball Seed Co., and GreenCircle Greenhouses for donating plant material

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J.B. Million, J.E. Barrett, T.A. Nell, and D.G. Clark

Experiments were conducted with four kinds of flowering plants to compare one-time vs. continuous application of paclobutrazol in subirrigation water. When a crop reached the stage at which it required growth regulator treatment, four concentrations of paclobutrazol were applied via subirrigation either one-time or continuously until the crop was terminated. Based upon regression equations, concentrations resulting in 30% size reduction for one-time applications of paclobutrazol were 0.01 mg·L-1 for Begonia ×semperflorens-cultorum `Cocktail Gin', 0.09 mg·L-1 for Impatiens wallerana Hook. `Super Elfin White', 0.2 mg·L-1 for Dendranthema ×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura `Tara', and 2.4 mg·L-1 for Petunia ×hybrida Vilm.-Andr. `Plum Crazy'. Respective optimal values for continuous application were 0.005, 0.02, 0.06, and 0.4 mg·L-1. Increasing the concentration for continuous application had a greater effect on paclobutrazol efficacy than did increasing the concentration for a single application. In a trial with impatiens `Super Elfin Salmon Blush', the paclobutrazol concentration was reduced 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% (single application) for each successive subirrigation event following an initial application of 0.1 mg·L-1 of paclobutrazol. The 50%, 75%, and 100% reduction treatments provided similar levels of size control. Dilution was more important when the reduction rate was less than 50%. Chemical name used: (±)-(R*,R*)-β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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Chi Won Lee, Gye-Soon Jeong, and Byoung-Ryong Jeong

Toxicity symptom of micronutrients copper, magnesium and zinc were investigated for geranium, marigold, vinca and zinnia. Plants were grown in peat-lite mix in 11 cm plastic pots and watered with nutrient solutions containing 0.05, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 mM concentrations of Cu2+, Mg2+ and Zn2+. In most species, the concentrations of these micronutrients higher than 5 mM greatly reduced plant growth and induced stem and foliar toxicity symptoms. Toxic levels of Cu2+ and Zn2+ reduced plant and leaf sizes without producing leaf spots in all species tested. Toxicity symptom of Mn2+ were characterized by numerous chlorotic or brown leaf spots. Visual leaf toxicity symptoms of these 3 micronutrients in each species are illustrated.