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Yan Chen, Regina P. Bracy, Allen D. Owings, and Donald J. Merhaut

systems increases mitigation capacity and provides efficient N and P removal that is important for small-sized treatment structures in urban areas ( Jayaweera and Kasturiarachchi, 2004 ; Stewart et al., 2008 ). In addition, when ornamental plants are used

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Wayne W. Hanna, Brian M. Schwartz, Ann R. Blount, Gary Knox, and Cheryl Mackowiak

‘PP-1’ (PP27536) ornamental perennial Arachis was approved for release by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2012. We established ‘PP-1’ in a test at Tifton, GA, with five perennial peanut cultivars

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John R. Havis

Abstract

Root hardiness is reported for 38 container-grown woody ornamentals taken from commercial nursery storage in mid-winter. Lethal root temperature ranged from −5° to −23.3°C.

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Jayesh B. Samtani, Gary J. Kling, Hannah M. Mathers, and Luke Case

space to the landscape plant. Weed occurrence in containers can cause growth reduction of woody ornamentals by nearly 50% in a single growing season ( Fretz, 1972 ) and decrease the aesthetic value of the crop plant. Hand weeding is not an economic

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Taryn L. Bauerle, William L. Bauerle, Marc Goebel, and David M. Barnard

biomass within the central depth (10–20 cm) of the container than the other three species ( P ≤ 0.001). Fig. 1. Average total root biomass for 2-year-old liners of six ornamental tree species (red maple, honey locust, red oak, birch, redbud, and hornbeam

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H. B. Tukey Jr.

Abstract

We often use the noun “ornamentals” to describe plants used in landscapes, around homes and other buildings, in parks and public gardens, and along streets and highways. However, “ornamentals” can be perceived quite differently by others outside our profession and with serious consequences.

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David Gopaulchan, Adrian M. Lennon, and Pathmanathan Umaharan

Anthurium has emerged as a popular tropical ornamental in international markets. The cut flower consists of a brilliantly colored modified leaf called the spathe with a protruding, cylindrical inflorescence called the spadix. Spathe color is one of

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Robert E. Uhlig, George Bird, Robert J. Richardson, and Bernard H. Zandstra

( Cucumis sativus ), and strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa ) ( Csinos et al., 2000 ; Fennimore et al., 2003 ; Gilreath et al., 2004 ). However, there has been limited research reported for MB alternatives in ornamentals ( Carpenter et al., 2000

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Christopher J. Currey and John E. Erwin

study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of additional Kalanchoe spp. as new flowering ornamental plants. Our objectives in this study were to: 1) identify the response of Kalanchoe spp. to photoperiodic treatments and classify them into

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Kenneth C. Sanderson

Abstract

H.B. Tukey, Jr.’s request for a better word than “ornamentals” (HortScience 22:9, Feb. 1987) is a point well taken: however, “urban plants” may or may not be an acceptable replacement. It is true that “ornamentals” does us a great disservice. Whether “urban plants” with a professional connotation would be any better would depend on its acceptance in the mind and market. A correct term is needed to qualify the essential and beneficial effects of ornamental horticulture on human beings. It must have both psychological and economic meanings.