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Dariusz Swietlik and Stephen S. Miller

Abstract

The addition of (2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-1,2,4-triazoI-1-yl-) pentan-3-ol) (paclobutrazol, PP333) at 0.05 or 0.20 ppm to a nutrient solution in which 4-month-old apple (Malus domestica, Borkh.) seedlings were growing, reduced terminal growth and increased root to leaf ratio. Plants pretreated with 0.20 ppm PP333 did not show a reduction in transpiration due to subsequent applied water stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG), whereas untreated plants decreased their transpiration in response to PEG stress at −0.5 and −0.75 MPa. The PP333 pretreatment at 0.20 ppm improved water balance of the seedlings since they had a higher water potential than untreated seedlings at equal or higher transpiration rates. Leaf osmotic adjustment to lower water potentials was shown to be leaf age-dependent irrespective of PP333 pretreatment.

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Genhua Niu, Denise S. Rodriguez, and Wayne Mackay

decreased ( Björkman et al., 1980 ). However, no relationship was found between leaf water potential and leaf stomatal conductance ( g S ) for oleander ( Gollan et al., 1985 ). Two representative commercial cultivars, Hardy Pink and Hardy Red, and two

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C. H. Peacock and A. E. Dudeck

Abstract

Two cultivars of Seashore Paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz.), ‘Adalayd’ (‘Excaliber’) and ‘FSP-1’, were grown in solution culture at 6 levels of salinity derived from synthetic sea water. Cultivars differed in changes of leaf water potential, leaf water potential components, and in growth responses to increased salinity. ‘Adalayd’ exhibited a linear decrease whereas ‘FSP-1’ exhibited a quadratic decrease in leaf water potential with increasing salinity. Leaf osmotic potentials decreased linearly for both cultivars, but there was a significant interaction. Leaf turgor potential decreased linearly for ‘Adalayd’ but quadratically for ‘FSP-1’. ‘FSP-1’ had greater tolerance to salinity in solution culture than Adalayd.

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Xiaoya Cai, Terri Starman, Genhua Niu, and Charles Hall

constant SMCs (9%, 15%, 22%, and 32%), Nemali and van Iersel (2008) found that gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf water potential were similar between 32% and 22% SMC for impatiens ( Impatiens wallerana Hook.) and salvia ( Salvia splendens

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Mindy L. Bumgarner, K. Francis Salifu, Michael V. Mickelbart, and Douglass F. Jacobs

Technologies, Inc., Plainfield, IL) and the Accumet 950 pH/ion Meter (Fisher Scientific, Pittsburgh, PA), respectively. Seedlings were sampled on a different five dates (21 June, 7 July, 29 July, 14 Aug., and 10 Sept. 2007) for predawn leaf water potential

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Mahvash Zarei, Majid Azizi, Majid Rahemi, and Ali Tehranifar

, for each treatment were measured. Leaf water potential. The third fully expanded leaf on each plant was used to measure midday leaf water potential (ψ). After cutting a leaf with a sharp blade, it was put in the chamber of a pressure bomb (PMS

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Emad Bsoul, Rolston St. Hilaire, and Dawn M. VanLeeuwen

( Ehleringer et al., 1993 ; Farquhar et al., 1989 ), and chlorophyll fluorescence ( Feser et al., 2005 ; Percival and Sheriffs, 2002 ) are physiological attributes that delineate the fitness of a plant for drought. Predawn stem or leaf water potential is a

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R. Paul Schreiner and Jungmin Lee

, which may have influenced whole vine biomass and nutrient contents. Leaf water potential was determined from the same leaves used for gas exchange by placing the leaf in a plastic bag and cutting the petiole with a razor blade immediately after taking

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Julián Miralles-Crespo, María J. Sánchez-Blanco, Alejandra Navarro G., Juan J. Martínez-Sánchez, Jose A. Franco L., and Sebastián Bañón A.

R. alaternus and C. citrinus , respectively ( Fig. 5 ), values that can be considered reference values for shrubs without water stress ( De Herralde et al., 1998 ; Munné-Bosch et al., 1999 ). Fig. 5. Leaf water potential evolution for drought and

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B. Shaun Bushman, Lijun Wang, Xin Dai, Alpana Joshi, Joseph G. Robins, and Paul G. Johnson

d of treatment, PI 440603 had significantly higher ψLEAF than the other three entries ( Fig. 3 ). Fig. 3. Leaf water potential responses of four kentucky bluegrass entries under increasing salt treatments and for 28 d of treatment. Error bars