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Luise Ehrich, Christian Ulrichs, and Heiner Grüneberg

control). Treatment 7 (FB): supplemental lighting at 400 W·h −1 with high-pressure sodium lamps for 12 h·d −1 from date of planting (otherwise as control). Corms and plant development were regularly monitored by collecting the following data: height of

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John Erwin, Rene O’Connell, and Ken Altman

treatments [DL plus NI (2200–0200 hr ; 2 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 from incandescent lamps)], +25, +45, or +75 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium lamps (0800–0200 hr ; 18-h photoperiod; 0800–0200 hr ). SD was achieved by pulling an

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Neil O. Anderson, Esther Gesick, Vincent Fritz, Charlie Rohwer, Shengrui Yao, Patricia Johnson, Steven Poppe, Barbara E. Liedl, Lee Klossner, Neal Eash, and Judith Reith-Rozelle

-old plants) and 2005 (for 1-year-old-plants) until rooted. Tip cuttings rooted in ≈1 week. Hence, they were grown in greenhouse conditions (lat. 45° N; St. Paul, MN) for 4 weeks of vegetative growth (long days, 0800 to 1600 hr supplied by 400-W high-pressure

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Yun Kong and Youbin Zheng

ranged between 5.5 and 7.0. Pots were arranged in a randomized block design with three blocks and four NaCl concentrations within each block. The greenhouse conditions were set at 18-h light/6-h dark by supplementing natural sunlight with high pressure

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Yun Kong and Youbin Zheng

with four blocks and four NaCl concentrations within each block. The greenhouse conditions were set at 18-h light/6-h dark by supplementing natural sunlight with high-pressure sodium lamps to achieve a photosynthetically active radiation at the canopy

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Christopher J. Currey and John E. Erwin

, under ambient irradiance conditions (St. Paul, MN, 45° N) supplemented with 75 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 photosynthetic photon flux from high-pressure sodium lamps when ambient irradiance was less than 200 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 from 0700 to 0100 hr (18-h photoperiod

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Brian Christensen, Sridevy Sriskandarajah, and Renate Müller

in a propagation room at 20 °C. Light was provided by SON-T high-pressure sodium lamps (Philips, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) for a 16-h photoperiod and with an intensity of 145 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 (photosynthetically active radiation) at the plant

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Hävard Eikemo, May B. Brurberg, and Jahn Davik

additional 1 to 2 weeks before pathogen inoculation. Artificial light was provided by high-pressure sodium lamps (SON/T, 120 μ E ·s −1 ·m −2 ) in periods with less than 16 h of natural light. Before inoculation, the plants were subjectively graded for size

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Mark J. Howieson and Nick Edward Christians

temperatures were 18 to 25 °C with a photoperiod of 16 day/8 night. Natural sunlight was supplemented with high-pressure sodium lamps that provided an additional 180 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 of photosynthetic active radiation ( PAR ). Measurements of PAR made

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Janni Bjerregaard Lund, Theo J. Blom, and Jesper Mazanti Aaslyng

the ratio during twilight. As seen in this experiment, it is advisable to use light sources with a high R:FR ratio for photoperiod extension [e.g., high-pressure sodium lamps with R:FR = 4.06 ( Murakami et al., 1997 )]. However, some long-day plants