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A. Maaike Wubs, Ep Heuvelink, Leo F.M. Marcelis, Gerhard H. Buck-Sorlin, and Jan Vos

and the same architecture could be established in all plants. Supplemental light was provided by high-pressure sodium lamps (600 W; Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands), which provided 150 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 at crop level. Lamps were switched on between

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Oliver Körner, Jesper Mazanti Aaslyng, Andrea Utoft Andreassen, and Niels Holst

were continuously measured, averaged over 5 min, and stored in a data logger (CR10X; Campbell Scientific, Logan, Utah). Supplementary lighting was used (see Table 1 ). Ten high-pressure sodium lamps (SON-T, 400 W; Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

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John Erwin, Rene O’Connell, and Ken Altman

treatments [DL plus NI (2200–0200 hr ; 2 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 from incandescent lamps)], +25, +45, or +75 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium lamps (0800–0200 hr ; 18-h photoperiod; 0800–0200 hr ). SD was achieved by pulling an

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Christopher Parry and Bruce Bugbee

studies were conducted in a spatially uniform greenhouse environment in the Research Greenhouse Complex at Utah State University, Logan (lat. 41.7°N, 111.8°W). To achieve rapid growth rates in all studies, supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium

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Christopher J. Currey and Roberto G. Lopez

-extension lighting (≈2 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 at canopy level) from 1700 to 2000 hr with incandescent lamps. High-pressure sodium lamps delivered a supplemental photosynthetic photon flux ( PPF ) of 100 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 at plant height [as measured with a light quantum

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Luise Ehrich, Christian Ulrichs, and Heiner Grüneberg

control). Treatment 7 (FB): supplemental lighting at 400 W·h −1 with high-pressure sodium lamps for 12 h·d −1 from date of planting (otherwise as control). Corms and plant development were regularly monitored by collecting the following data: height of

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Christopher J. Currey, Kellie J. Walters, and Kenneth G. McCabe

environmental computer (Titan; ARGUS Control Systems, Surrey, BC, Canada). The day and night greenhouse air temperature set points were 22.0 ± 1.0 °C and 20.0 ± 1.0 °C, respectively. High-pressure sodium lamps delivered a supplemental photosynthetic photon flux

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Christopher J. Currey and Nicholas J. Flax

provided. High-pressure sodium lamps delivered a supplemental photosynthetic photon flux of 191 ± 27 µmol·m −2 ·s −1 at plant height [as measured with a quantum sensor (LI-190 SB; LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE)] to maintain a target daily light integral

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Yun Kong and Youbin Zheng

ranged between 5.5 and 7.0. Pots were arranged in a randomized block design with three blocks and four NaCl concentrations within each block. The greenhouse conditions were set at 18-h light/6-h dark by supplementing natural sunlight with high pressure

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Hävard Eikemo, May B. Brurberg, and Jahn Davik

additional 1 to 2 weeks before pathogen inoculation. Artificial light was provided by high-pressure sodium lamps (SON/T, 120 μ E ·s −1 ·m −2 ) in periods with less than 16 h of natural light. Before inoculation, the plants were subjectively graded for size