Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dennis P. Stimart x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Dennis P. Stimart

The Allen Centennial Gardens are instructional gardens managed by the Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Twenty-two garden styles exist on the 2.5-acre (1.0-ha) campus site with a primary focus on herbaceous annual, biennial and perennial ornamental plants. The gardens are used for instruction mostly by the Department of Horticulture and secondly by departments of art, botany, entomology, landscape architecture, plant pathology, and soils. Class work sessions are limited due to the gardens' prominence on campus, high aesthetic standards, space restrictions, and large class sizes. Undergraduate students are the primary source of labor for plant propagation, installation and maintenance; management; and preparation of interpretive literature. Work experience at the gardens assists students with obtaining career advances in ornamental horticulture. Future challenges include initiating greater faculty use of the gardens for instruction and creating innovative ways to use the gardens to enhance instruction.

Free access

Rozlaily Zainol and Dennis P. Stimart

Genetic analysis of a white double-flowering Nicotiana alata is being investigated. Self-pollination of the double-flowering plant produced all double progeny. Reciprocal hybridization of the double-flowered selection with N. alata cultivars produced nondouble F1 progeny that segregated 3:1 (nondouble to double) in the F2 generation. Reciprocal backcrosses of F1 plants to the parents resulted in nondouble progeny when backcrossed to the nondouble parent and 1:1 segregation when backcrossed to the double parent. Intercross of F1 plants resulted in progeny segregating 3:1. Double flowering habit has been transferred to white, red, salmon, green, and bicolor N. alata. Results suggest double flowering is under nuclear control regulated by a recessive allele.

Free access

Rozlaily Zainol and Dennis P. Stimart

A double-flower form of Nicotiana alata Link & Otto was characterized genetically as a monogenic recessive trait expressed when homozygous. Reciprocal crosses demonstrated no maternal effect on expression of double flowers. A single dominant gene expressed in the homozygous or heterozygous state caused the single-flower phenotype. The symbol fw is proposed to describe the gene controlling double-flower phenotype.

Free access

Dennis P. Stimart and James F. Harbage

The role of the number of adventitious roots of Malus domestics Borkh. `Gala' microcuttings in vitro on ex vitro root and shoot growth was investigated. Root initiation treatments consisted of IBA at 0, 0.15, 1.5, 15, and 150 μm in factorial combination with media at pH 5.5, 6.3, and 7.0. IBA concentrations significantly influenced final root count and shoot fresh and dry weights, but not plant height, leaf count, or root fresh and dry weights at 116 days. Between 0 and 0.15 μm IBA, final root counts were similar, but at 1.5, 15, and 150 μm IBA, root counts increased by 45%, 141%, and 159%, respectively, over the control. The pH levels did not affect observed characteristics significantly. There was no significant interaction between main effects. A significant positive linear relationship was found between initial and final root count. The results suggest a limited association between high initial adventitious root count and subsequent growth. Chemical name used: 1 H -indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Free access

William J. Martin and Dennis P. Stimart

Narrow-sense heritabilities and genetic correlations of ornamental quality traits of Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) were evaluated with special reference to cut flower postharvest longevity (PHL). Inbreds P1 (16 days PHL) and P2 (3 days PHL) were hybridized to produce an F1 (P1 × P2) that was self-pollinated to produce an F2 population. The F2 were self-pollinated to produce F3 families and advanced through single-seed descent by self-pollination to the F5 generation. P1, P2, F1, F3, F4, and F5 were evaluated for ornamental quality traits. Quality traits were found to be quantitative and normally distributed. Narrow-sense heritability (h2) estimates were high and consistent across generations examined; PHL h2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 ± 0.06. Phenotypic and genotypic correlations revealed underlying physiological and pleiotropic interactions relevant to breeding programs aimed at simultaneous improvement of ornamental quality traits. PHL is inversely related to cut flower strength and days to flower, -0.44 ± 0.04 and -0.43 ± 0.44. Buds at discard is positively correlated to cut flower and plant diameter, cut flower weight and days to flower, 0.77 ± 0.05, 0.58 ± 0.06, 0.71 ± 0.06, and 0.77 ± 0.07, respectively. Gain from selection for quality traits of interest can be rapid.

Free access

Kenneth R. Schroeder and Dennis P. Stimart

Leaf impressions were made from two short-lived (4 and 5 d) inbreds, a long-lived (11 d) inbred, and their hybrids (8 and 9 d) of Antirrhinum majus L. using Super Glue and glass microscope slides. Leaves were taken from mid stem, pressed on glass slides (under side down), spread with a small amount of Super Glue, set for 3 to 4 s. Then, the leaf was peeled off leaving a permanent impression in the glue. Slides were placed under a microscope equipped with a video imaging system and computer images were taken to facilitate counting of stomatal complexes. Number of stomata ranged from 10,400 to 21,300 per cm2 of leaf. A LI-COR LI-3100 area meter (LI-COR, Inc. Lincoln, Neb.) was used to measure total leaf area of 40-cm cut flower stems of each accession. Stomata per flowering stem ranged from 1,074,000 to 2,282,000, with the long-lived inbred having the fewest stomata, the hybrids intermediate with 11% to 21% more, and the short-lived inbreds having 40% to 113% more stomata per stem. It appears long postharvest life of A. majus is associated with flowering stems with fewer stomata per cut stem.

Free access

Dennis P. Stimart and John C. Mather

Cotyledons from developing 6- to 8-week-old embryos of Liatris spicata (L.) Willd. (blazing star) were cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0, 0.4, 4.4, or 44.4 μm BA or 0, 0.2, 2.2, or 22.2 μm TDZ to induce adventitious shoot formation. The highest percentage of cotyledons forming the most shoots was on medium containing 2.2 μm TDZ. Cotyledon-derived callus cultured on medium containing 4.4 μm BA formed ≈16 times more adventitious shoots than on 2.2 μm TDZ. Adventitious shoots derived from cotyledons or callus produced roots when placed on MS medium containing 5.0 μm IBA. Regenerated plants that flowered in the field appeared homogeneous. Chemical names used: N6-benzyladenine (BA), thidiazuron (TDZ), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Free access

William J. Martin and Dennis P. Stimart

On-plant floret longevity and cutflower postharvest longevity (PHL) of Antirrhinum majus L., snapdragon, were evaluated using inbreds P1 (16 day PHL) and P2 (6 day PHL), F1 (P1 × P2), F2 (F1 self-pollinated), F2 × F2 (among and within PHL categories: long, 17 to 25 days; middle, 9 days; and short, 2 to 3 days), and F3 families (F2 self-pollinated). F2 on-plant floret longevity and PHL correlated to later generation PHL. Prediction of progeny PHL from F2 × F2 matings appears feasible if genotypic value for PHL of F2 is known. Selection for PHL is best based on evaluation of multiple cutflowers per genotype. Significant additive and dominant genetic variance components contribute to PHL.

Free access

James F. Harbage and Dennis P. Stimart

Many physiological responses in plants are influenced by pH. The present chemiosmotic hypothesis suggests that auxin uptake into plant cells is governed by pH. Since auxin is used widely to enhance rooting, the influence of pH on 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) induced adventitious root formation was examined. Roots were initiated aseptically in 5 node apical shoot cuttings of micropropagated Malus domestica 'Gala'. Initiation was induced using a four day pulse in IBA and 15 g/L sucrose at pH 5.6 and 30C in the dark. Observations showed pH rose to 7.0 or greater within 1 to 2 days from microcutting placement in unbuffered initiation medium. Root numbers from shoots in media containing 1.5 μM IBA buffered with 10 mM 2[N-morpholino] ethanesulfonic acid (MES) to pH 5.5, 6.0, 6.5 or 7.0 with KOH resulted in average root numbers of 14.2, 10.9, 8.7, and 7.1, respectively, while unbuffered medium yielded 7,6 roots per shoot. Comparison of MES buffered medium at pH 5.5, 6.25 or 7.0 in factorial combination with IBA at 0, 0.15, 1.5, 15.0, and 150.0 μM resulted in a significant pH by IBA interaction for root number. At 0, 0.15 and 1.5 μM IBA root numbers were greatest at pH 5.5. At 15.0 μM IBA, pH 6.25 was optimal and at 150.0 μM IBA all three pH levels produced equivalent root numbers. A calorimetric assay to measure IBA removal from the initiation medium by microcuttings of `Gala' and `Triple Red Delicious' showed more IBA removal at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0. Possible reasons for the effect of pH on adventitious root formation will be discussed.

Free access

Wendy S. Higgins and Dennis P. Stimart

Lilium longiflorum Thunb. `Ace' bulblets generated in vitro at 25 or 30C were stored at 4C for O, 1, 2, 4, or 6 weeks after removal from culture and before planting to ascertain the effects of in vitro generation temperature and post-in vitro cold storage duration on bulblet growth responses during 36 weeks of greenhouse growth. Increasing post-in vitro storage duration decreased the number of days to first leaf emergence and percentage of plants producing shoots within 36 weeks, but increased the number of days to shoot emergence and anthesis, leaf number, and flower bud number. The length of time required for bulblet development from planting to shoot emergence was affected by storage duration more than periods from shoot emergence to visible bud and anthesis. It is feasible to produce high-quality L. longiflorum pot plants from in vitro-produced bulblets.