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Ellen T. Paparozzi

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Ellen T. Paparozzi

Fertilizer particularly nitrogen is part of the concern about groundwater contamination. Many floricultural and ornamental plants do not need the high rates of nitrogen that are typically recommended. However, whenever one alters the quantity of a given nutrient the overall nutrient balance, as well as other physiological processes, changes. A brief overview of our research on poinsettias, roses, and chrysanthemums will be presented. Suggested ratios, critical S levels and nutrient problems associated with incorrect balances will be shared. Limitations due to statistical methods and the impact nutrient balance has on certain plant processes such as flowering and coloring and thus, consumer acceptance will be summarized. Future plans in this area may focus on the need for new statistical techniques, nutrient acquisition by roots and consumer perceptions of plant quality.

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Ellen T. Paparozzi

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Ellen T. Paparozzi

As a floriculturist, when I first decided to grow strawberries (Fragaria ×ananassa) in the greenhouse, I thought it would be a snap. After all, I could practice what I preach to my classes in that I would use all the sustainable growing tricks from floriculture, create a production time line and it would be ready, set grow. However, moving a field-grown summer crop into a greenhouse as a winter crop was not the same as moving a winter greenhouse-grown crop outside for the summer. Not only were the plants typically grown in lush field soil, but also the fertilizer recommendations were not directly translatable (i.e., parts per million nitrogen). The pesticides used were not licensed for greenhouses and of course, there were no clues as to schedules of what to do when. Finally, there were the mystery problems that occurred. With high gas prices and the interest in local food production, it seems probable that over the next 5 to 10 years, more and more fruit, vegetables and even nut plants will be moved into greenhouse and high tunnel production. The purpose of this article is to identify the kinds of information needed to make a “smooth” transition from field to greenhouse for alternative crops, like strawberries, grown during nontraditional seasons.

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Kim Williams, Ellen T. Paparozzi, and Jerry Maranville

As universities are required to “right-size,” faculty resources of time and expertise are strained as the institution must cater to undergraduate students while providing a complete graduate curriculum. Thus, many institutions are offering more team taught courses. For a new upper-level undergraduate and lower-level graduate course offering in Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management, the team consists of faculty from two institutions who each bring different expertise into the classroom. The course utilized weekly chat room discussions to bring students into contact with experts from around the United States and the world. Two-way compressed video was used to allow for synchronous lecture delivery and discussion across sites. A Web site was created to facilitate student interaction and provide chat room access. Multiple student evaluations were conducted to separate learning objectives with the effectiveness of using technology. A flow-chart will be presented which details the steps and problems/accomplishments encountered in successfully delivering this course via distance technologies, including: funding procurement, determining technological compatibility across institutions, delineation of course content, Web page development, and course evaluations.

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Stacy A. Adams and Ellen T. Paparozzi

Nitrogen and sulfur are macronutrients required by plants to form amino acids used in protein synthesis and other metabolic processes. Commercial poinsettia nutrient recommendations suggest N levels of 350-400 ppm later reduced to 200-250 ppm N. Previous hydroponic research determined that N may be reduced by half if supplied S levels are adequate. The purpose of this study was to look at multiple N and S levels and gauge the effects these combinations had on plant quality.

Poinsettia cv. `Dark Red Hegg' plants, grown in a soilless mix, were fertilized with 56 N and S combinations. N was supplied from 100-275 ppm and S from 0-75 ppm. Plants were evaluated quantitatively by chroma meter readings every three weeks and qualitatively by marketability evaluations from commercial producers, retailers, and consumers.

Results indicate 0 ppm S plant color was more yellow-green than all others. Plants were greener as N increased from 100-150 ppm with no difference above 175 ppm. Evaluators identified plants receiving 0 ppm S and 100 or 125 ppm N as unmarketable. N may be reduced to 175 ppm with no effect on plant quality if adequate S is applied.

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Kimberly A. Williams and Ellen T. Paparozzi

A model for the creation of shared synchronous courses between universities has been developed based on our experiences during the development and delivery of an upper-level undergraduate/graduate course in Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management offered by Kansas State Univ. and the Univ. of Nebraska–Lincoln. The course was conducted during the Spring 1999 semester using two-way compressed video so that instructors and students at both sites could see and hear each other in live time. Our model is set up as a flow-chart and currently has 10 steps that include areas such as “Identifying the Need,” “University Must-Do's,” “Distance Class Technology Requirements,” and “Advertising the Course.” Each step details procedures to follow, offers ideas and suggestions, and includes examples taken from our course. Also included is information about web site development and chat room use. The model is easily adapted for use with distance technologies similar to two-way compressed video such as Internet 2. An electronic version of the model can be accessed at http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/dp_hfrr/Floriculture.

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M. Elizabeth Conley and Ellen T. Paparozzi

In order to understand the effects of reduced nitrogen and sulfur on overall poinsettia plant growth and development, experiments were run to determine the relationship, if any, between nitrogen and sulfur applied and other macroand micronutrients. Cuttings of `Freedom Red' (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) were grown vegetatively in a peat:perlite:vermiculite mix during the fall and spring. Three levels of sulfur (0, 12.5, 25 ppm) were applied in combination with four levels of nitrogen (50, 100, 200, 275 ppm). The experimental design was a randomized complete block. Leaf samples were analyzed using LECO for nitrogen and ICP-ES for sulfur. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine trends in the nutrient concentration of other macronutrients and micronutrients. Nutrient analyses indicated that all nutrients were present in sufficient quantities. Leaf concentrations of nitrogen, sulfur, potassium, and copper were distinctly higher in spring and fall, while phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, and iron concentrations were higher in fall. The typically subtle effects of sulfur were most obvious in magnesium and calcium leaf concentrations. Phosphorus and calcium concentrations increased at lower levels of applied nitrogen. Concentrations of boron, copper, and manganese also increased strikingly at lower levels of applied nitrogen. Apparently when levels of nitrogen less than 200 ppm are applied, micronutrient uptake increases, suggesting the potential of either luxury consumption or possible toxic effects if too little nitrogen is supplied.