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William R. Graves, Robert J. Joly, and Michael N. Dana

Honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis Wind.) and tree-of-heaven Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle] sometimes are exposed to high root-zone temperatures in urban microclimates. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that seedlings of these species differ in how elevated root-zone temperature affects growth, leaf water relations, and root hydraulic properties. Shoot extension, leaf area, root: shoot ratio, and root and shoot dry weights were less for tree-of-heaven grown with the root zone at 34C than for those with root zones at 24C. Tree-of-heaven with roots at 34C had a lower mean transpiration rate (E) than those grown at 24C, but leaf water potential (ψ1) was similar at both temperatures. In contrast, shoot extension of seedlings of honey locust grown with roots at 34C was greater than honey locust at 24C, E was similar at both temperatures, and ψ1 was reduced at 34C. Hydraulic properties of root systems grown at both temperatures were determined during exposure to pressure in solution held at 24 or 34C. For each species at both solution temperatures, water flux through root systems (Jv) grown at 34C was less than for roots grown at 24C. Roots of tree-of-heaven grown at 34C had lower hydraulic conductivity coefficients (Lp) than those grown at 24C, but Lp of roots of honey locust grown at the two temperatures was similar.

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Kimberly A. Klock, Henry G. Taber, and William R. Graves

Growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants decreases at root-zone temperatures (RZTs) >30 °C, but no research has been conducted on the effects of changes in root respiration on P acquisition at supraoptimal RZT. We monitored the changes every 3 to 5 days in root respiration, root surface phosphatase activity, and P acquisition of `Jet Star' tomato plants grown in Hoagland's no. 1 solution held at 25 and 36 °C RZT for 19 days. Root respiration rate in plants grown at 25 °C increased linearly from RZT initiation to day 12, but there was no difference in respiration between days 12 and 19. Root respiration at 36 °C, however, increased from RZT initiation to day 8 and then decreased. Shoot P concentration and root phosphatase activity for plants grown at 25 °C did not change during the experiment. Shoot P concentration for plants at 36 °C, however, linearly decreased over time, and root phosphatase activity linearly increased over time. Decreased shoot growth and demand for P along with decreased root respiration after day 8 probably resulted in the decreased P uptake and shoot P concentration in plants grown at 36 °C RZT.

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James A. Zwack, William R. Graves, and Alden M. Townsend

Little is known about drought stress resistance of Freeman maples (Acer ×freemanii E. Murray), which are hybrids of red maples (A. rubrum L.) and silver maples (A. saccharinum L.). The objective of our study was to measure plant growth and leaf water relations of `D.T.R. 102' (Autumn Fantasy), `Celzam' (Celebration), and `Marmo' Freeman maples subjected to drought. Plants grown from rooted cuttings were subjected to four consecutive cycles of water deficit followed by irrigation to container capacity. Average stomatal conductance at container capacity for all cultivars was 255 mmol·s-1·m-2 in the first drought cycle and 43 mmol·s-1·m-2 during the fourth drought cycle. Predawn and midmorning leaf water potentials of droughted plants at the end of the fourth drought cycle were 1.16 and 0.82 MPa more negative than respective values for control plants. Osmotic potential of leaves at full turgor was -1.05 MPa for controls and -1.29 MPa for droughted plants, indicating an osmotic adjustment of 0.24 MPa. Root and shoot dry mass and leaf area were reduced similarly by drought for all cultivars, while Celebration exhibited the least stem elongation. `Marmo' treated with drought had the lowest root-to-shoot ratio and the greatest ratio of leaf surface area to root dry mass. Autumn Fantasy had the lowest ratio of leaf area to stem xylem diameter. Specific leaf mass of drought-stressed Autumn Fantasy was 1.89 mg·cm-2 greater than that of corresponding controls, whereas specific masses of Celebration and `Marmo' leaves were not affected by drought. Leaf thickness was similar among cultivars, but leaves of droughted plants were 9.6 μm thicker than leaves of controls. This initial characterization of responses to drought illustrates variation among Freeman maples and suggests that breeding and selection programs might produce superior genotypes for water-deficient sites in the landscape.

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Anthony S. Aiello, William R. Graves, and John E. Preece

Along with its horticultural uses, silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) can be grown for biomass in areas that vary greatly in annual rainfall and temperature. Silver maples from five provenances ranging from 33 to 46° N latitude were subjected to drought stress and to high root-zone temperature (RZT) in separate experiments to assess their suitability as biomass sources. In the drought experiment, control plants were irrigated every 2 days, while stressed plants were irrigated every 15 days. Initial results indicated provenance differences among control plants in dry mass, leaf area, and transpiration. Drought reduced growth and mitigated differences among provenances. Osmotic potential of leaves was higher in control plants than in drought-stressed plants. Plants from two provenances (33 and 44° N) were grown with RZT of 24 and 34 C for 3 weeks. Gain in fresh mass over time was reduced at 34 C for plants of both origins, but plant dry matter and leaf surface area were similar at the two RZT. Data collected to date suggest resistance to drought and high RZT is similar in plants of different provenances.

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Janet M. Batzli, William R. Graves, and Peter van Berkum

Maackia amurensis Rupr. & Maxim. is a leguminous tree with potential for increased use in urban landscapes. Information on the nutrition of M. amurensis is limited. To our knowledge, modulation and N2 fixation have not been reported. Our objective was to examine M. amurensis for nodulation and N2 fixation. Soil samples were collected near legume trees at arboreta throughout the United States, with additional samples from Canada and China. Seedlings were grown for six weeks in a low-N, sterile medium and inoculated with soil samples. Upon harvest, small white nodules were found on the lateral and upper portions of the root systems. Bacteria were isolated from the larger nodules, subculture, and used to inoculate seedlings. Inoculated plants nodulated and fixed N2 as determined by the acetylene reduction assay. We conclude M. amurensis forms N2-fixing symbioses with Rhizobium.

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Carol M. Foster, William R. Graves, and Harry T. Horner

Early nodulin genes, such as ENOD2, may be conserved and could function as molecular markers for nodulation. Many nodulating and nonnodulating legumes must be analyzed before the role of such genes in nodulation can be determined. Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood are closely related, ornamental woody legumes. Unsubstantiated reports of nodulation in Japanese pagodatree require confirmation, and American yellowwood has not been observed to nodulate. We investigated the presence of putative ENOD2 genes in these species, and we are studying differential and temporal expression. Genomic DNA of Japanese pagodatree and primers, derived from proline-rich pentapeptide repeats of conserved ENOD2 sequences, were used to obtain a 555-bp PCR fragment. This cloned fragment was used as a probe for Southern and Northern hybridizations. Genomes of Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood contained sequences that are similar to ENOD2 sequences in other legumes. Treatments with either cytokinin or an auxin transport inhibitor may induce expression of the putative ENOD2 genes. New data on the characteristics of nodulin genes in woody legumes will clarify the nature and evolution of nodulation in legumes and may have implications for developing sustainable nursery production protocols.

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J. Ryan Stewart, William R. Graves, and Reid D. Landes

Carolina buckthorn [Rhamnus caroliniana Walt. or Frangula caroliniana (Walt.) Gray] is an attractive and water-stress-resistant shrub or small tree distributed extensively in the southeastern United States that merits use in managed landscapes. Due to substantial climatic differences within its distribution (30-year normal midwinter minima range from 13 to -8 °C), selection among provenances based on differences in cold hardiness is warranted. Before selections are marketed, the potential of carolina buckthorn to be invasive also merits investigation. Ecological problems resulting from the introduction of Rhamnus L. species in the United States, most notably the dominance of R. cathartica L. (common buckthorn) over neighboring taxa, are due in part to early budbreak. Consequently, we investigated depth of cold hardiness and vernal budbreak of carolina buckthorn and common buckthorn. Stem samples of carolina buckthorn and common buckthorn collected in midwinter survived temperatures as low as -21 and -24 °C, respectively. Although the cold hardiness of carolina buckthorns from Missouri was greater than that of carolina buckthorns from Ohio and Texas on 2 Apr. 2003, there were no differences in cold hardiness of stems from Missouri and Texas on all three assessment dates in the second experiment. All plants survived at both field locations except for the carolina buckthorns from southern Texas planted in Iowa, which showed 0% and 17% survival in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Budbreak of both species with and without mulch in Ames, Iowa, was recorded from 9 Apr. to 10 May 2002. Mean budbreak of common buckthorn was 5.7 days earlier than budbreak of carolina buckthorn, and buds of mulched carolina buckthorns broke 4.2 days earlier than did buds of unmulched carolina buckthorns. We conclude that the cold hardiness of carolina buckthorn is sufficient to permit the species to be planted outside of its natural distribution. Populations of carolina buckthorn in Ohio and Missouri should be the focus of efforts to select genotypes for use in regions with harsh winters. Phenology of its budbreak suggests carolina buckthorn will not be as invasive as common buckthorn, but evaluation of additional determinants of invasiveness is warranted.

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Lorna C. Wilkins, William R. Graves, and Alden M. Townsend

Six red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and four Freeman maple (A. ×freemanii E. Murray) cultivars were compared for rooting of single-node stem cuttings and subsequent development of rooted cuttings. Cuttings were taken in May 1990 and 1991 and treated with either 3 or 8 g IBA/kg. Rooting after 4 weeks differed among cultivars, ranging from 22% for `Karpick' to 100% for `Schlesinger' over both years. Rooting scores, based on root counts and lengths, were highest for `Schlesinger' and lowest for `Scarlet Sentinel' and `Karpick'. IBA at 8 g·kg–1 resulted in better rooting than at 3 g·kg–1. Mean length of shoots formed on potted rooted cuttings was 22.6 cm for `Franksred', which initiated shoots on 100% of the cuttings that rooted. In contrast, <50% of `Armstrong', `Jeffersred', `Karpick', `Northwood', and `Scarlet Sentinel' rooted cuttings initiated shoots, and mean length of new shoots was <4 cm for these cultivars. The amount of leaf desiccation that occurred after removing cuttings from the propagation bench varied among cultivars, and the percentage of viable leaf surface area correlated positively with final root or shoot dry mass for all cultivars. Chemical name used: indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

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James A. Zwack, William R. Graves, and Alden M. Townsend

Freeman maples (Ace×freemanii E. Murray) are marketed as stress-resistant alternatives to red maples (Acer rubrum L.). Our objective was to compare two cultivars of Freeman maple [`Jeffersred' (Autumn Blaze®) and `Indian Summer'] and five red maples [`Franksred' (Red Sunset®), `Autumn Flame', `PNI 0268' (October Glory®), `Fairview Flame', and unnamed selection 59904] for effects of flooding and water deficit on plant growth, biomass partitioning, stomatal conductance, and leaf osmotic potential. Plants grown from rooted cuttings in containers were subjected to three consecutive cycles during which root-zone water content decreased to 0.12, 0.08, and 0.02 m3·m–3, respectively. Additional plants were flooded for 75 days, while plants in a control treatment were irrigated frequently. Stomatal conductance immediately before imposing drought and after three drought cycles did not differ among genotypes and averaged 220 and 26 mmol·s–1·m–2, respectively. Differences in stomatal conductance after recovery from the first drought cycle and at the end of the second drought cycle did not vary with species. Drought reduced estimated leaf osmotic potential similarly for all genotypes; means for drought-stressed and control plants were –1.92 and –1.16 MPa, respectively. Freeman maples had a higher mean root: shoot weight ratio and a lower leaf surface area: root dryweight ratio than did red maples. Across genotypes, stomatal conductance of flooded plants initially increased by ≈20% and then fell to and remained below 50 mmol·s–1·m–2. Stomatal conductance of `Indian Summer' decreased to ≈20 mmol·s–1·m–2 after 8 days of flooding, indicating that this cultivar may be particularly sensitive to root-zone saturation.

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Melita M. Biela, Gail R. Nonnecke, William R. Graves, and Harry T. Horner

Temperature, as a potential environmental stressor, interacts with photoperiod in floral initiation of June-bearing strawberries (Fragaria ×ananassa), such that high-temperature exposure can result in poor floral initiation. Our objectives were to examine the effects of various durations of high root-zone temperature on floral initiation and development and on vegetative growth and development. In a 1998 greenhouse experiment, hydroponically grown `Allstar' June-bearing strawberry plants were subjected day/night temperatures of 31/21 °C in the root zone for one, two, or three continuous periods (of ≈7 days), followed by exposure to 17 °C for the duration of the experiment. Control plants were raised at 17 °C in the root zone throughout the experiment. An additional temperature treatment was exposure to 31/21 °C in the root zone for two periods, each followed by a period at 17 °C. Plants were arranged in a randomized complete-block design with factorial treatments of duration of high root-zone temperature and harvest time. At the end of each period, plants were harvested and the apical meristems dissected for microscopic evaluation of vegetative and floral meristems and the stage of development of the primary flower. We observed floral initiation in all treatments after photoperiodic induction. However, exposure to 31/21 °C in the root zone during key periods of floral initiation in June-bearing strawberry may alter floral development.