Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 68 items for

  • Author or Editor: Timothy K. Broschat x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Timothy K. Broschat

Germination rate was significantly improved by removing the thick, hard endocarp from Butia capitata (pindo palm) fruit. Time to 50% of final germination rate was not affected by endocarp removal. Afterripening storage did not improve germination rate or time. Germination at 104 °F (40 °C) was superior to that at 93 °F (34 °C).

Full access

Timothy K. Broschat

Container-grown Bougainvillea Comm. Ex Juss. `Brasiliensis' were fertilized with ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, or ammonium sulfate plus sodium nitrate as N sources. Plants fertilized with sodium nitrate were stunted, extremely chlorotic, and produced few flowers compared to those receiving ammonium sulfate. In a second experiment bougainvilleas were fertilized with 12 different controlled-release or soluble ammonium, urea, or nitrate fertilizers as N sources. Plants grown with only nitrate N were chlorotic, stunted, and produced fewer flowers compared to those receiving N from urea or ammonium salts. High substrate pH, associated with nitrate fertilization, was believed to be a cause of the chlorosis, but possible toxicity symptoms (small necrotic lesions and premature leafdrop) were also observed on nitrate-treated plants. Plants receiving controlled-release urea or potassium nitrate were of higher quality than those receiving similar uncoated fertilizers.

Open access

Timothy K. Broschat

Abstract

Principal component analysis of soil and foliar analysis and plant quality data for field-grown Salvia splendens Sello cv. Red Pillar was useful for pointing out relationships among these variables and suggested possible growth limiting factors. Soil P and foliar P, Ca, Cu, Zn, and N were found to be positively related to plant quality on the first principal component, whereas soil K, Ca, Mg, and NO3 and foliar Fe were negatively related to quality. The former elements are thought to be limiting growth in this situation, while the latter elements in some way suppress the uptake or utilization of the deficient elements. The third and fourth components described well known relationships of soil pH with soil and foliar concentrations of several elements.

Full access

Timothy K. Broschat

Downy jasmines [Jasminum multiflorum (Burm. f.) Andr.] and areca palms [Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.] were grown in containers filled with a fine sand soil (SS) or with a pine bark-based potting substrate (PS). Each of these substrates was amended with 0%, 10%, or 20% clinoptilolitic zeolite (CZ) by volume. Plants were fertilized monthly with a water-nonsoluble 20N-4.3P-16.6K granular fertilizer. Downy jasmines were larger and had darker color in CZ-amended PS and were larger in CZ-amended SS than in nonamended SS or PS. Areca palms, which tend to be limited by K in SS had better color and larger size when the SS was amended with CZ. In PS, where K is seldom limiting, areca palms did not respond to CZ amendment of the PS. Both ammonium (NH4)-N and potassium (K) were retained against leaching by CZ, but some of the NH4-N adsorbed to CZ was subject to nitrification, either before or after its release into the soil solution. Some phosphate (PO4)-P was also retained by CZ.

Free access

Timothy K. Broschat and Henry Donselman

Open access

Timothy K. Broschat and Henry Donselman

Abstract

A series of experiments evaluated the effects of seed maturity, seed cleaning, gibberellic acid (GA3) or water presoaking, temperature, and planting depth on the percentage and speed of germination of Chrysalidocarpus lutescens H. Wendl. seed. Effects of temperature, cleaning, and storage container on the viability of stored C. lutescens seed were determined in another set of experiments. Germination was rapid and consistent when yellow to fully ripe seed was exposed to temperatures between 30° and 35°C. Cleaning seed is not essential if planting is done immediately. Presoaking seeds in 1000 ppm GA3 for 48 hr slightly accelerated germination speed, but caused excessive elongation of the resulting seedlings and was therefore not recommended. The best method for long-term storage of C. lutescens seed was to clean yellow to fully ripe seed, air-dry at 80% to 90% RH, treat with a seed protectant fungicide, and store at 23° in tightly sealed polyethylene containers. Optimum planting depth was dependent on the drying potential of the germination site.

Open access

Timothy K. Broschat and Henry Donselman

Abstract

Although nutrient deficiency symptoms for widely grown dicotyledonous crops are well-known and generally similar for a given element (5), deficiency symptoms of many elements on tropical monocotyledonous ornamental plants are unknown (4). Symptoms often differ dramatically among these taxa and may often be attributed to non-nutritional causes.

Open access

Henry Donselman and Timothy K. Broschat

Abstract

Dracaena marginata Lam., grown continuously in full sun, produced an average of 4.3 basal branches per plant, while plants grown under 50% shade produced no basal branches. Acclimatized plants with a maximum number of shoots can be produced in 20-liter containers in 12 months by growing in full sun for 9 months to induce basal branching followed by 3 months in 50% shade for acclimatization.

Open access

Timothy K. Broschat and Henry Donselman

Abstract

Ficus elastica Roxb. ex. Hornem. ‘Robusta’, F. benjamina L., Schefflera arboricola Hayata ex Kanehira, and Dracaena marginata Lam. were air-layered using 2 wounding methods. Rooting was best in double-slit F. elastica, but girdling produced a greater number of roots in the other 3 species. Girdling D. marginata stems induced coarse, unbranched roots, while a finer, more fibrous root system was produced on double-slit plants. Water conductivity through the wounded stem segments was reduced substantially in all 4 species by either form of wounding, with girdled stems having the lowest conductivities for S. arboricola and the 2 Ficus species.

Open access

Timothy K. Broschat and Henry Donselman

Abstract

The genus Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) consists of about 150 species of tropical herbaceous plants having banana-like foliage and ranging in height from 30 cm to 6 m. Some species have attractive reddish or multicolored foliage, making them useful tropical landscape plants.