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Lori A. Black, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

Dormant-budded `Gloria' azaleas (Rhododendron sp.) were used to observe the effect of forcing irradiance, temperature, and fertilization on postproduction performance after flower bud dormancy had been broken. Four experiments were conducted during forcing, the treatments for each experiment were: Expt. 1, three forcing irradiances (200,460, and 900 μmol·m-2·s-1) and three postproduction irradiances (4, 8, and 16 μmol·m-z·s-1); Expt. 2, three forcing irradiances (320, 560, and 1110 μmol·m-2s-l); Expt. 3, three controlled day/night temperatures (18/16C, 23/21C, and 29/27C); Expt. 4, fertilizer applied for 7, 14, or 28 days at either 150 or 300 mg N/liter (12% nitrate, 8% ammoniacal) 20N-4.8P-16K soluble fertilizer at every watering, control plants did not receive fertilizer. Days to harvest (time until plants had eight individual open flowers) was less at the high forcing irradiances and temperatures and when fertilizer was applied during forcing. Flower color was less intense at the low forcing irradiance levels, high temperatures, and when duration of fertilization was prolonged and concentration was high. There were more open flower inflorescences at week 2 of postproduction at high forcing irradiance levels, but their number was not affected by forcing temperature or fertilization. Postproduction longevity was shorter when forcing was at 29/27C (day/night) and when plants were fertilized for 28 days at 300 mg N/liter, but was not affected by forcing or postproduction irradiance.

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Nadia Roude, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

Chrysanthemums `Bright Golden Anne' and `Iridon' [Dendranthemum ×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura] were grown with N concentrations of 1.3, 2.6, or 5.2 kg N/m' of water during the crop cycle from either Osmocote slow-release 14N-6.2P-11.6K or 12.4N4.4P-14.lK or Peters soluble 20N-4.4P-16.6K. Plants were moved to simulated interior rooms at flowering to evaluate effects of the treatments on longevity. `Bright Golden Anne' longevity was not affected by fertilizer source, but `Iridon' longevity was reduced when Peters soluble fertilizer was applied at 2.6 and 5.2 kg N/m3 of water, whereas N concentration did not affect longevity when the slow-release Osmocote fertilizer was used. In an additional study, `Tip', `Copper Hostess', and `Iridon' were grown in three soil media using 1.3, 2.6, or 5.2 kg N/m' of water using Peters soluble 20N-4.4P-16.6K fertilizer from time of planting until flowering. Longevity increased as N concentration decreased when chrysanthemums were grown in Metro Mix 350, whereas N concentration had no significant effect on chrysanthemums grown in Vergro Klay Mix or a peat-perlite-sand mix. `Tip' showed significant in. creases in longevity as N concentration decreased.

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Lori A. Black, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

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Barbara C. Poole, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

Premature flower bud abscission imposes a serious limitation on longevity of potted Hibiscus in interiorscape situations, Ethylene is known to be one causative factor. Past research has suggested that carbohydrate depletion of buds may also be involved,

A series of experiments was conducted to examine the relationship between carbohydrate levels and ethylene sensitivity of flower buds under low irradiance levels. Two cultivars were used: `Pink Versicolor', which is very susceptible to bud abscission, and the more resistant `Vista', In the first experiment, plants were harvested twice weekly after placement in interiorscape rooms (8.5 μmol m-2 s-1 for 12 hrs per day; 26.5°C day/night) until all buds had abscissed. At each harvest, buds from four size groups were collected for analysis. In the second experiment, source/sink strength of buds was manipulated by selective daily removal of certain sized buds. Remaining buds were collected just prior to abscission for analysis. In two additional experiments, `Pink Versicolor' plants were treated with either silver thiosulfate or ethephon prior to placement in interiorscape rooms. Plants were harvested twice weekly and buds collected. For all experiments, bud dry wt, total soluble sugars and starch content were determined.

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Barbara C. Poole, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

Premature flower bud abscission imposes a serious limitation on longevity of potted Hibiscus in interiorscape situations, Ethylene is known to be one causative factor. Past research has suggested that carbohydrate depletion of buds may also be involved,

A series of experiments was conducted to examine the relationship between carbohydrate levels and ethylene sensitivity of flower buds under low irradiance levels. Two cultivars were used: `Pink Versicolor', which is very susceptible to bud abscission, and the more resistant `Vista', In the first experiment, plants were harvested twice weekly after placement in interiorscape rooms (8.5 μmol m-2 s-1 for 12 hrs per day; 26.5°C day/night) until all buds had abscissed. At each harvest, buds from four size groups were collected for analysis. In the second experiment, source/sink strength of buds was manipulated by selective daily removal of certain sized buds. Remaining buds were collected just prior to abscission for analysis. In two additional experiments, `Pink Versicolor' plants were treated with either silver thiosulfate or ethephon prior to placement in interiorscape rooms. Plants were harvested twice weekly and buds collected. For all experiments, bud dry wt, total soluble sugars and starch content were determined.

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James E. Barrett, Carolyn A. Bartuska, and Terril A. Nell

Paclobutrazol drench treatments were evaluated for efficacy on Caladium ×hortulanum (Birdsey) cultivars Aaron, White Christmas, and Carolyn Wharton. Drenches at 2.0 mg/pot did not reduce height of `Aaron' and `White Christmas' plants when applied 1 week after planting, but 2.0 mg applied at 3 weeks after planting did result in shorter plants. The difference for time of application may be due to the amount of roots present to take up paclobutrazol when applied. In two factorial experiments, there were no interactions between cultivar and time of application or amount of chemical. Paclobutrazol at 0.5 mg/pot resulted in plants that were shorter than the controls. Higher amounts of paclobutrazol provided additional reductions in height, but there was variation between the experiments for degree of effect with amounts >1 mg. Generally, commercially acceptable height control was provided by paclobutrazol drench treatments at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/pot applied 3 weeks after planting. Chemical names used: (2RS,3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl-pentan-3-ol (paclobutrazol).

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G.H. Pemberton, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

Senescence of gladiolus flowers, like many geophytes, does not involve a climacteric burst of ethylene. Eleven gladiolus cultivars were screened and all were non-climacteric (NC) for both respiration and ethylene production. Average ethylene levels for individual flowers were 0.5 μl C2H4/kg per h or less. As in other NC flowers, protein synthesis may be linked to senescence. Our goal was to identify specific proteins that were involved in the senescence process that could be used as indicators of postharvest longevity. SDS-PAGE protein profiles of cut gladiolus flowers were determined from a tight bud stage to senescence. Both increases and decreases were observed in major polypeptides that may be connected to postharvest flower longevity. Total protein content of gladiolus flower petals decreased by ≈70% during the profile period. This could explain the relatively short postharvest life of 3 to 5 days for individual gladiolus flowers. Total protein profiles were probed with an ACC synthase antibody to establish the relationship of this enzyme in NC senescence.

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William M. Womack, James E. Barrett, and Terril A. Nell

`Prize' and `Gloria' azaleas were budded at 29C day/24C night without growth regulators. Dormant-budded plants were held at 2, 7, 13, or 18C for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 weeks and then forced in walk-in growth chambers (29C day/24C night). A model was developed to describe the effect of cooling temperature and duration on days to marketability (eight open flowers) and percent of buds showing color. Holding at temperatures below 7C, increases days to marketability up to 7 days. Extended cooling (beyond 6 weeks) at temperatures <7C increases percent of buds showing color. Extended holding at temperatures >7C decreases buds in color due to development of bypass shoots during cooling and increased bud abortion. Plants not receiving a cool-treatment or cooled for <2 weeks do not flower uniformly. Furthermore, the percentage of plants reaching marketability dramatically decreases for plants held longer than 6 weeks at temperatures >7C. Both cultivars show similar trends, but `Gloria' has greater variability.

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Richard K. Schoellhorn, James E. Barrett, and Terril A. Nell

`Improved Mefo' chrysanthemums were grown at 22C/18C and 34C/28C day/night temperature regimes to evaluate the failure of lateral bud development following pinching of this temperature sensitive cultivar. The number of viable buds on plants at the high temperatures was 40% of number at low temperature. Loss of bud viability was categorized as those buds that were: 1) absent, or 2) those in which growth was present, but inhibited. Inhibited buds were visible swellings surrounded by dense masses of secondary cell wall material. Anatomical studies were completed to verify the absence of lateral buds and determine what cellular changes imposed inhibition on those buds that did develop. A second group of experiments demonstrated that moving low-temperature plants to the high temperature caused production of viable buds to decline. Plants were moved from high temperatures to low, and reciprocally to high from low temperature. Anatomical sampling of apical meristems began at time of shift and at 1, 2, 4, and 8 days after temperature shift. High-temperature meristems possessed predominantly non-viable lateral buds, with few viable buds present.

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Trinidad Reyes, Terril A. Nell, and James E. Barrett

`Tara' and `Boaldi' were fertilized with 150 and 450 ppm from 20N–4.7P–16.6K soluble fertilizer and moved at flowering to postproduction conditions (21 ± 2C and 10 μmol·m–2·s–1). Shipping was simulated for 1 week at 26C. `Tara' exhibited burned leaf margins (necrosis) and chlorosis following shipping. At 150 ppm, leaves had brown, dried margins, but the damage did not progress indoors. Necrosis was worse at 450 ppm. Leaf chlorosis/necrosis of non-shipped plants at the 450 fertilizer level did not appear until the 3rd week indoors. At experiment termination, no leaf damage occurred in non-shipped `Tara' or `Boaldi' with 150 ppm. `Boaldi' did not show damage after shipping regardless of the treatment but symptoms (necrosis and wilting of leaves) evolved during the first 2 weeks indoors on plants fertilized with 450 ppm. A 50% reduction in root soluble carbohydrates was found at the highest fertilizer rate at flowering, suggesting that leaf chlorosis/necrosis is related to carbohydrate depletion in chrysanthemum.