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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

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David Shupert*, Natalie Anderson, and David Byrne

Seedlings from three interspecific backcross rose populations derived from a F1 population were used to study inheritance of several traits in roses. Three F1 plants (WOB13, WOB21, and WOB26) from the hybridization of the diploid parents Rosa wichuraiana and `Old Blush' were backcrossed to `Old Blush' to produced three populations to observe the segregation of several morphological and disease resistance traits. The segregating rose traits in the backcrosses are no prickles on stems, non-recurrent blooming habit, white single flowers, black spot resistance, and powdery mildew resistance present in the Rosa wichuraiana parent compared to prickles on stems, recurrent blooming habit, pink double flowers, black spot susceptible, and powdery mildew susceptible present in the `Old Blush' parent. Visual data was collected for the segregating traits using color standards and rating scales as appropriate. The three populations expressed the segregating traits to varying degrees. Under the environmental conditions at College Station, Texas the population `Old Blush' × WOB26 had a greater expression of the traits for no prickles on stems, recurrent blooming habit, disease resistance to black spot, and disease resistance to powdery mildew, which are traits desired in breeding programs. The segregation of flower color (white/pink), and flower type (single, semi double, and double) were similar in all three populations.

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Yan Ma, David H. Byrne, Jing Chen, and Amanda Byrne

Several rose species (Rosa rugosa, R. wichuraiana, R. setigera, R. laevigata, R. banksiae, R. roxburghii, R. odorata and hybrids) were employed to establish the appropriate nutrient media for shoot multiplication and root initiation of cultured shoots and to describe a procedure for the successful transfer to soil of plants obtained in vitro. Cultured shoot tips and lateral buds from different genotypes proliferated multiple shoots on a basal medium (MS salt, vitamins, glycine, sucrose and agar) supplemented with 0mg/l to 6mg/l 6-benzylamino purine (BA) and 0mg/l to 0.5 mg/l naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Most rose species cultured in a modified MS medium supplemented with 2mg/l BA showed good growth and shoot proliferation. The buds nearest the apex exhibited the slowest rate of bud development. Root development was enhanced and shoot development inhibited by lowering the concentration of MS salts to quarter- and half-strength. With difficult-to-root species, rooting was improved by supplementing the media with auxin or giving them 3-7days of dark treatment.

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Young-ju Kim and David H. Byrne

The hybrid origin of 23 rose (Rosa spp.) accessions was examined with three isozymes: acid phosphatase (E.C.3.1.3.2), malate dehydrogenase (E.C.1.1.1.37), and phosphoglucose isomerase (E.C.5.3.1.9). All three isozymes were useful for interspecific hybrid verification. This procedure was effective if the putative parents were known and differed in isozyme phenotype. To verify the origin of hybrid species or cultivars with hybrid origins, isozymes were useful but limited by the number of generations since the original hybridization and the number of accessions of the putative parental species assayed.

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David H. Byrne and Terry A. Bacon

A computer program was developed to calculate the percent contribution of the founding parents for any given peach or nectarine (Prunus persica) cultivar. The founding parents used most frequently for three low-chill (0 to 500 chill units) peach and nectarine breeding programs (Florida and Pelotas and Campinas, Brazil) were determined. The Florida program used several low-chill honey type peaches (`Hawaiian', `Okinawa') as a source of low chilling and then did extensive crossing with higher quality cultivars developed mainly in the northeastern United States. About 50% of the background of the Brazilian peach releases consists of local selections that were originally brought by the Portuguese explorers. Although each of the Brazilian programs used local peach materials, the local peaches used by each program are different. In addition, the program at Pelotas used germplasm from the Georgia–Florida and New Jersey breeding programs and the Campinas program used `Jewel' (honey peach) and several Florida nectarines (`Sunlite', `Sunred') in their development work. The founding parents among these three programs, although there is some common parentage, are different, and the intercrossing of materials from the various programs would be a useful approach to create more diversity in this germplasm.

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Jonathan W. Sinclair and David H. Byrne

Carbohydrate energy source of various tissue culture media has an effect on growth and survival of the explants. Sucrose is the standard carbohydrate used in most tissue culture systems. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of five carbohydrate sources (fructose, glucose, maltose, sorbitol, and sucrose) at two levels (2% and 3%) on germination, growth, and survival of immature peach embryos (9.7 to 14.7mm) in vitro. Five cultivars were used. Overall, fructose, maltose, and sucrose each stimulated germination and growth as the primary carbohydrate energy source of peach embryo culture to the same degree; glucose and sorbitol were inferior. However, fructose was superior to sucrose in one cultivar. In general, sugar level did not affect survival, although cultivars did vary somewhat. Survival was found to be highly dependent upon embryo maturity.