Field Evaluation of Natural, Engineered, and Combined Resistance Mechanisms in Potato for Control of Colorado Potato Beetle

in Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
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  • 1 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
  • 2 Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Biotechnology Division, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1
  • 3 Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824

The colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is the leading insect pest of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in northern latitudes. Host plant resistance has the potential use in an integrated pest management program for control of colorado potato beetle. During the 1998 and 1999 seasons, field studies were conducted to compare natural (leptine glycoalkaloids and glandular trichomes), engineered (Bt-cry3A and Bt-cry5 transgenic potato lines), and combined (Bt-cry5+glandular trichomes) plant resistance mechanisms of potato for control of colorado potato beetle. Nine different potato clones representing five different host plant resistance mechanisms were evaluated under natural colorado potato beetle infestation at the Montcalm Research Farm in Entrican, Michigan. The Bt-cry3A transgenic lines, the high leptine line (USDA8380-1), and the high foliar glycoalkaloid line (ND5873-15) were most effective for controlling defoliation by colorado potato beetle adults and larvae. The Bt-cry5 line (SPc5-G2) was not as effective as the Bt-cry3A transgenic lines ('Russet Burbank Newleaf,' RBN15, and YGc3.1). The glandular trichome (NYL235-4) and Bt-cry5+glandular trichome lines proved to be ineffective. Significant rank correlations for the potato lines between the two years were observed for egg masses, second and third instar, and fourth instar seasonal cumulative mean number of individuals per plant, and defoliation. Egg mass and first instar seasonal cumulative mean number of individuals per plant were not strong indicators of host plant resistance in contrast to second and third instars or adults. Based on these results, the Bt-cry3A transgenic lines, the high leptine line, and the high total glycoalkaloid line are effective host plant resistance mechanisms for control of colorado potato beetle.

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Contributor Notes

Corresponding author; e-mail douchesd@msu.edu.
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