Pistachio Rootstocks Influence Scion Growth and Ion Relations under Salinity and Boron Stress

in Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
View More View Less
  • 1 Kearney Agricultural Center, University of California. 9240 South Riverbend, Parlier, CA 93648
  • | 2 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, George E. Brown, Jr., Salinity Laboratory, 450 W. Big Springs Road, Riverside, CA 92507
  • | 3 Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 4 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, George E. Brown, Jr., Salinity Laboratory, 450 W. Big Springs Road, Riverside, CA 92507
  • | 5 Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521

Performance of `Kerman' pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) trees on three rootstocks (P. atlantica Desf., P. integerrima Stewart and `UCB-1', a P. atlantica × P. integerrima hybrid) was evaluated with 2-year-old trees grown in sand-tank lysimeters under combined SO42- and Cl- salinity and boron (B) stress for 6 months. Four salinity treatments were imposed by irrigating the plants with water at electrical conductivity (ECiw) of 3.5, 8.7,12, or 16 dS·m-1 each containing B at 10 mg·L-1. Growth of `Kerman' was evaluated based on increase in total leaf area, increase in trunk diameter, and total above-ground biomass production. All growth parameters decreased as salinity increased, but were not significant until ECiw exceeded 12 dS·m-1. However, growth of `Kerman' on P. atlantica and `UCB-1' was considerably better than on P. integerrima at 16 dS·m-1. The onset and severity of foliar injury differed among scions and treatments and was attributed primarily to B toxicity, rather than the effects of salinity. Concentrations of B in injured leaf tissue ranged from 1000 to 2500 mg·kg-1. Leaf injury decreased with increasing salinity, although leaf B was not significantly reduced suggesting an internal synergistic interaction between B and other mineral nutrients. However for P. vera on P. integerrima, the highest level of salinity produced the greatest injury, possibly as a combination of B plus Cl- and/or Na+ toxicity. Leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance, and chlorophyll concentration of P. vera, determined by steady-state porometry, were also reduced to a greater degree by combined salinity and B when budded on P. integerrima than on the other two rootstocks.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: e-mail cgrieve@ussl.ars.usda.gov.
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 410 120 12
PDF Downloads 484 147 14