Modified-atmosphere Packaging of Blueberry Fruit: Effect of Temperature on Package O2 and CO2

in Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Authors:
Randolph M. BeaudryDepartment of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325“

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Arthur C. CameronDepartment of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325“

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Ahmad ShiraziDepartment of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325“

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Diana L. Dostal-LangeDepartment of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325“

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Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. `Bluecrop') fruit sealed in low-density polyethylene packages were incubated at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, or 25C until O2 and CO2 levels in the package reached a steady state. A range of steady-state O2 partial pressures (1 to 18 kPa) was created by placing a range of fruit weights within packages having a constant surface area and film thickness. The steady-state O2 partial pressure in packages containing the same weight of fruit decreased as temperature increased, indicating the respiratory rate rose more rapidly (i.e., had a greater sensitivity to temperature) than O2 transmission through the film. Steady-state O2 and CO2 partial pressures were used to calculate rates of O2 uptake. CO2 Production. and the respiratory quotient (RO). The effects of temperature and 02 partial pressure on O2 uptake and CO2 production and the RQ were characte∼zed. The steady-state O, partial pressure at which the fruit began to exhibit anaerobic CO2 production (the RQ breakpoint) increased with increasing temperature, which implies that blueberry fruit can be stored at lower O2 partial pressures when stored at lower temperatures.

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