Variations in Levels of Four Natural Growth Regulators During Growth and Flowering of ‘Gloria’ Azalea1

in Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Authors:
T. Davis SydnorNorth Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

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Roy A. LarsonNorth Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

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Abstract

Three gibberellins; GA3, GA4, GA7; and abscisic acid (ABA) from the shoot tips of greenhouse grown ‘Gloria’ azaleas, Rhododendron sp.L., were tentatively identified using column chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and Rumex leaf senesence bioassay. Growth regulators were quantitatively estimated biweekly from 6 weeks after shoot tip removal until anthesis.

GA3 levels remained nominal for the normal commercial treatment until after plants were returned to 19°C from the 9° cooler. Endogenous GA3 levels then peaked at 0.6 μg/bud at anthesis. GA4 levels remained fairly constant for all treatments and times at 0.1 μg/bud. GA7 levels remained fairly constant below 2 μg/bud except in the cold-treated plants when endogenous GA7 levels peaked at 0.6 μg/bud at the time that plants were removed from the cooler.

ABA levels were similar until 24 wks. from pinch when the levels dropped to undetectable levels in cold-treated plants and increased in treatments not given a cold treatment by peaking at 0.1 μg/bud at 28 wks. from pinch.

Of the commercially available gibberellins that were monitored, GA7 seemed to be the best treatment for chemically overcoming flower bud dormancy in azalea.

Contributor Notes

Received for publication August 26, 1974, Paper No. 4450 of the Journal Series of the North Carolina Agricultural Experimental Station, Raleigh. From a dissertation presented by the senior author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree.

Present address: Department of Horticulture, Ohio State University, Columbus. This research made possible by a research grant from the Fred C. Gloeckner Foundation.

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