Physical and Chemical Properties of Media Composed of Milled Pine Bark and Sand1

in Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Authors:
E. F. BrownUniversity of Georgia College of Agriculture, College Station, Athens

Search for other papers by E. F. Brown in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
F. A. PokornyUniversity of Georgia College of Agriculture, College Station, Athens

Search for other papers by F. A. Pokorny in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Abstract

Bulk density (BD) of potting media increased as the percentage of sand was increased in the medium. Because of the “fitting” together of particles, volume of medium mixtures was always less than the total volume of the separate components. Particle size distribution was determined most accurately on a volume basis and was used to identify the potting mixtures. The percentage of medium components (bark or sand) retained on any given sieve size could be determined from BD data. Percolation rate, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) declined as the percentage of sand was increased in the potting mixture. CEC was most accurately determined on a volume basis. Increasing the percentage of sand in the potting medium raised pH from 4.1 to 5.4.

Contributor Notes

Received for publication February 20, 1974. Supported in part under Hatch Project 411, University of Georgia College of Agriculture Experiment Stations, Athens. The pine bark used was supplied by courtesy of Fernacre Farms, Washington, GA.

Portion of dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of requirements for Ph.D. degree in Plant Science. Current address: Glynn Academy, Brunswick. GA.

  • Collapse
  • Expand