HortTechnology

HortTechnology is a peer-reviewed open-access science journal published by ASHS. The primary mission is to publish accurate, clear, reproducible, and unbiased articles in the field of practical horticultural science. HortTechnology seeks to advance selected peer-reviewed papers derived from topics in practical horticultural investigations with the primary goal of improving capabilities of horticultural practitioners and students, or recommending best practices for horticultural operations, or advancing knowledge concerning the intrinsic social benefits associated with the intersection of humanity and horticulture. Aims and Scope

HortTechnology is an open-access publication and adheres to Creative Commons licensing: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 -- You may share, copy and re-distribute this material for non-commercial purposes in any medium.

Impact Factor: 1.387                      H-Index = 59                      SJR = 0.397 [Q2]                      

Frequency: February, April, June, August, October and December - Online only

 

Most read articles since January 2018:

 

Aims and Scope

Editorial Board / Publications Staff

Abstracting and Indexing

Contact Us

 

Aims and Scope 

 

HortTechnology is a peer-reviewed open-access science journal published by ASHS. The primary mission is to publish accurate, clear, reproducible, and unbiased articles in the field of practical horticultural science. HortTechnology seeks to advance selected peer-reviewed papers derived from topics in practical horticultural investigations with the primary goal of improving capabilities of horticultural practitioners and students, or recommending best practices for horticultural operations, or advancing knowledge concerning the intrinsic social benefits associated with the intersection of humanity and horticulture.

The research investigations published in HortTechnology are limited to advances in knowledge derived from or associated with high-value specialty crops and their components or products. HortTechnology seeks to publish the results of comparative and evaluation research, typically conducted in real-world applications, and/or in classroom, field, or greenhouse environments on a large enough scale to support recommendations to practitioners. Generally, the results are ready for direct utilization by educators, growers, practitioners, and technical advisors..

HortTechnology adheres to Creative Commons licensing: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 -- You may share, copy and redistribute this material for non-commercial purposes in any medium.

HortTechnology print subscriptions and single issues are available by request exclusively through the Sheridan print-on-demand program. Please email pubsvc.tsp@sheridan.com for pricing and ordering details.

HortTechnology is listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).

 

Editorial Board / Publications Staff

 

Editor in Chief: Neal E. De Vos / ASHS
Publisher: Michael W. Neff / ASHS
Managing Editor: Sylvia DeMar / ASHS

Editorial Board

Tina Marie (Waliczek) Cade / Texas State University
Charles R. Hall / Texas A & M 
Mark A Ritenour / University of Florida-IFAS
Rebecca G. Sideman / University of New Hampshire

Consulting Editors

Book Reviews - Allen V. Barker / University of Massachusetts
Cannabis and Hemp - Jessica D. Lubell-Brand / University of Connecticut
Engineering and Structures - Arend-Jan Both / Rutgers University
Extension Education Methods - Susan S. Barton / University of Delaware
Floriculture/Foliage - Stephanie E. Burnett / University of Maine
Human Issues in Horticulture - Tina Marie (Waliczek) Cade / Texas State University
Landscape Horticulture - Eugene K. Blythe / Auburn University
Marketing - Charles R. Hall / Texas A & M
Nursery Crops - Kimberly K. Moore / University of Florida and Sarah A. White / Clemson University
Organic Horticulture - Mathieu Ngouajio / USDA-NIFA
Plant Health - Carlos E. Bográn / OHP, Inc. and Robert G. Linderman / Plant Health, LLC
Postharvest Handling - Mark A. Ritenour / University of Florida-IFAS
Public Horticulture - Robert E. Lyons / University of Delaware
Small Fruit - Joan R. Davenport / Washington State University
Statistics - Margaret A. Nemeth / Statistical Consultants Plus, LL
Teaching Methods - Richard L. Harkess / Mississippi State University
Tree Fruit - Louise Ferguson / UCDavis and Terence L. Bradshaw / University of Vermont
Turfgrass - Qi Zhang / North Dakota State University
Urban Horticulture and Controlled Environments - Kent Kobayashi / University of Hawaii
Variety Testing & Evaluation - Rebecca G. Sideman / University of New Hampshire
Vegetable Crops - Rebecca N. Brown / University of Rhode Island and Timothy W. Coolong / University of Georgia
Weed Management - J. Pablo Morales-Payan / University of Puerto Rico

 

Abstracting and Indexing

 

HortTechnology is abstracted and/or indexed in:

USDA
   -- Agricola
   -- PubAg
BIOBASE
   -- Plant Science
CABI
   -- AgBiotech New & Information
   -- CAB Abstracts
   -- CAB Direct

   -- Horticultural Abstracts
   -- Ornamental Horticulture
   -- Plant Breeding Abstracts
   -- Reviews of Agricultural Entomology
Chemical Abstract Service
   -- CA Plus
ISI
   -- Current Contents (Agriculture, Biology, and Environmental Sciences)
Web of Science
   -- Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE)
Scopus

 

Contact Us

 

Editorial enquiries:

Editorial team: horttech@ashs.org

 

 

 

 

Subjects Appropriate for Submission

Publishing Fees

Prior Publication

Publish Ahead of Print

Submission Process

 

Subjects Appropriate for Submission

 

Subjects appropriate for submission to HortHortTechnology include:

 

Technology and Product Reports

   Focus on new and innovative technologies, methods, equipment, and products.

Research Reports

   Research and development of interest to professionals in horticulture.

Production and Marketing Reports

   Reviews of markets, market values, production economics, and product market strategies.

Comprehensive Crop Reports

   In-depth reviews of individual crops with emphasis on commercial production.

Extension Education Methods /Teaching Methods

   Reports on innovative methods for disseminating information in extension/teaching programs.

Variety Trials

   Articles that detail the comparative performance of varieties/species based on traits of commercial interest.

Resources

   Listings of new publications, videos, and software

 

Publishing Fees

 

ASHS does not offer waivers of publication fees.

While we appreciate the financial difficulties experienced by researchers, there are many costs associated with publications, including online publications. ASHS is a small not-for-profit organization that depends on its manuscript fees to continue its programs including off-setting the costs of producing our peer-reviewed publications.

*Please note that ASHS Complimentary Student and Complimentary Early Career memberships cannot be applied to receive discounted publication fees.

 

HortTechnology publishing fees are based on a flat-fee structure. This fee includes unlimited page count articles, free color, complimentary author alterations, and unlimited images/graphs/tables.

The fees below apply to all submitted manuscripts.

 Member rate*:   $1,500
 Consulting Editors rate:   $1,000
 Non-member rate:   $2,500

*Papers must have at least one ASHS member as an author in order to qualify for the member rate.

 

“Short Paper” Pricing (1-2 Pages)**

 Member rate:   $500
 Consulting Editors rate:   $400
 Non-member rate:   $700

**Short Papers -- must be less than 1800 words including all titles, references, etc. May contain 2 scalable images only. Images may be either pictures or tables or a combination of both. Must indicate that paper is submitted as a Short Paper during the submission process.

 

Prior Publication

 

Any information that is already in the public domain in a scientific context will be considered published and will not be published again by ASHS. Submission of a manuscript to ASHS implies no concurrent submission elsewhere. Manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the ASHS and HortScience should be substantially different from industry-oriented publications and locally published progress or extension reports.

For HortTechnology, if a question exists about previous publication, send copies of the previously published material to the Editor. If industry-oriented publications will appear before the scientific article, make sure the industry report describes the take-home lesson and does not place the supporting data and graphs in a scientific context, as is customary in scientific articles. ASHS expects, but does not require, “first right” for publication of research reports presented at ASHS annual conferences.

 

Publish Ahead of Print

 

All manuscripts submitted to and accepted by HortTechnology will be published online, ahead of the print issue, when the article receives final approval.

 

Submission Process

 

To submit papers or peer review an article in HortTechnology, click: Submit
  • If you have previously submitted a paper to HortTechnology, you will be required to log in with your log in name and password. (Forgot your password? Use the "Unknown/Forgotton Password? link at the bottom of the log in page.)
  • First-time users of the online submission system must register for an account. Instructions on how to register for an account are accessed at the bottom of the log in page.
To download a pdf copy of the ASHS Style Manual and additional instructions for submitting papers to any ASHS journalclick here

 

 

 

 

 

  Select a volume below to get started. Then, click on an issue link to read more.

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December 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 6

Photos courtesy of the authors.

In his article on page [insert page number], Schnelle describes the eastern redcedar’s desirable ornamental features as well as landscape and utilitarian uses for humans and animals. The tree has a tendency, however, to encroach upon both abandoned and cultivated fields as well as grasslands, and control measures are warranted when the tree reaches beyond its original habitat. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05232-23

cover

October 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 5

Photos courtesy of the authors.

This month’s cover image is of avocado stumps and new shoots showing laurel wilt external and internal symptoms. (A) Healthy canopy coming from a stump where the new xylem ring remains asymptomatic (B). (C) Wilted canopy coming from a stump where the new xylem ring has vascular damage (D). For detailed information, please read the paper by Navia-Urrutia et al. that begins on p. 425. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05232-23

cover

August 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 4

Photos courtesy of the authors.

Interest in autonomous (i.e., robotic) mowers is growing within the turfgrass industry and the public. In the paper beginning on p. 377, Boeri et al. report on their study to evaluate the performance of autonomous mowers on St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) compared with conventional mowing practices. The cover images show St. Augustinegrass plots (top) showing enhanced green color when mown with the autonomous mower , and (bottom) the quality of cut comparison between an autonomous mower (left) and a conventional mulching mower (right). DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05206-23

cover

June 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 3

Photos courtesy of the authors.

In their paper, beginning on p. 286, Kalinowski et al. evaluate the impact of chemical treatments on final height, branching, first color, visible bud formation, and anthesis of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima). The cover images show the cultivar Prestige Red. (A) Mechanically pinched control plants. (B) Plants treated with dikegulac sodium. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05186-23

cover

April 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 2

Photos were taken on 15 Nov 2015 (A) and 16 Nov 2017 (B), courtesy of the Authors.

In their paper beginning on p. 193, Sideman et al. compared the performance of Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) cultivars in northern New England, USA and evaluated the effects of topping (apical meristem removal) on marketable yields.  On the cover are photos of : (A)  ‘Jade Cross E’ plants  (topped on dates from 24 Aug through 23 Oct, and untopped); and (B) ‘Diablo’ plants (topped on dates from 24 Aug through 11 Oct, and untopped). DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05170-22

cover

February 2023
HortTechnology Vol. 33 - Issue 1

Photos courtesy of Chad Miller and Matt Wilson.

In the plant identification course at Kansas State University, a trade show style class activity was implemented in place of a traditional classroom presentation activity. Students picked a plant genus of their choice and developed a trade show booth and then presented and marketed their plant genus to their classmates (trade show attendees). The activity was well received, and students indicated that it provided them with an opportunity to be creative and the trade show format was a good alternative communication exercise. Detailed information can befound in the paper by Chad Miller that begins on p. 111. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05148-22

 

cover

December 2022
HortTechnology Vol. 32 - Issue 6

Photos courtesy of the Authors.

In their review that begins on p. 479, Heckman et al. summarize their studies of mulching and amending soils with shade tree leaves and their potential in agricultural production. On the cover—(Top left): shows a  layer of shade trees being spread on a plot prepared for planting pumpkins (Top right). (Bottom left): The image shows harvested pumpkins from a bare plot (top) and a plot with leaf residue (bottom).  The bottom right image shows bagged shade tree leaves for use as livestock bedding. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05095-22

cover

October 2022
HortTechnology Vol. 32 - Issue 5

Photos courtesy of the Authors.

In their paper beginning on p. 398, Thompson et al. discuss the the benefits and drawbacks to using botanical scans as a study resource for students. The top photo shows botanical scans of Hibiscus sp. (top left) and Leucojum vernum (top right). The bottom image shows plant samples arranged on a flatbed scanner. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05085-22

cover

August 2022
HortTechnology Vol. 32 - Issue 4

Photos courtesy of the Authors.

At the 2021 American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference, the Teaching Methods Professional Interest Group hosted “Going beyond Zoom: Tips and Tricks for Teaching Horticulture Online.” This workshop provided a forum for the dissemination of tools, materials, and approaches used to facilitate active learning in horticulture courses. The cover image shows screen captures (A and B) of the instruction screens used to connect the audience with a game-based exercise using Kahoot! (Kahoot!, Oslo, Norway). For more information, please read the paper by Nunez et al. that begins on p. 325. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH05037-22

cover

June 2022
HortTechnology Vol. 32 - Issue 3

Photos: Carol Miles and Aidan Kendall.

To aid in decision-making about adopting mechanization in the cider apple orchard, it is essential to inform cider apple industry members about how mechanization could be economically feasible for their enterprise, as well as inform cider apple growers that harvest mechanization is available and could be adapted or customized for their crop. The types of mechanical harvesters available in the U.S., used for small-fruited crops and customizable for cider apples, are shake-and-catch harvesters and over-the-row harvesters. In the top picture, a shake-and-catch harvester is used to harvest pistachios. In the middle and bottom pictures, an over-the-row harvester is used to harvest cherries and cider apples, respectively. For additional information, read the paper by Galinato et al. that begins on p. 275. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH04964-21

cover

April 2022
HortTechnology Vol. 32 - Issue 2

Cover images courtesy of the Authors.

In their paper beginning on p. 90 , Zahid et al. report that a device for measuring branch cutting force and orientation was developed using force and inertial measurement sensors. A series of field tests were conducted with the device to record the cutting force and orientation for different apple cultivars. The tests were conducted with different setting of cutting points (branch placed at cutter center and cutter pivot) and cutting angles (0° and 30° angle relative to the normal). The cover images show some of the tools used in their research. DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH04924-21

cover

February 2022
HORTTECHNOLOGY Vol. 32 - Issue 1

Photos courtesy of the Author.

In the paper beginning on p. 28, author S. Yao reports on the effects of grafting techniques and climate factors for jujube (Ziziphus jujuba). On the cover: (top left): jujube bark grafting and (top right) whip/tongue grafting. After grafting, pinching branchlets stimulated new shoot growth: (bottom left) before and (bottom right) after pinching branchlets (black arrows) and new shoot emerging (red arrow). DOI:10.21273/HORTTECH04927-21

 

 

 

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