Impact of Row Spacing and Herbicide Rate and Application Method on Weed Control and Harvest Efficiency of Lima Bean

in HortTechnology
Authors:
Sujatha SankulaDepartment of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Research and Education Center, Road 6, Box 48, Georgetown, DE 19947.

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Mark J. VanGesselDepartment of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Research and Education Center, Road 6, Box 48, Georgetown, DE 19947.

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Walter E. KeeDepartment of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Research and Education Center, Road 6, Box 48, Georgetown, DE 19947.

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J.L. GlanceyDepartment of Bioresources Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717.

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Field studies were conducted in 1997 and 1998 to evaluate labeled (1×) or reduced (0.5×) rates of metolachlor plus imazethapyr preemergence either broadcast or band applications to lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) planted in 30-inch (76-cm) or 15-inch (38-cm) rows for weed control, yield, harvestability, and harvest recovery. Lima bean was planted in large plots simulating a commercial production system. All 30-inch rows were cultivated once 40 days after planting in 1997 and 21 days after planting in 1998. No differences were noted in weed densities between treatments both years. Marketable lima bean yield was greater from plots thatwere spaced 15 inches apart in 1997 only. However, total hand-harvested yield in both years, machine-harvested yield in 1998, and marketable yield in 1998 were not different between treatments. Measurements on harvest recovery revealed that a greater number of unstripped pods were left on plants after harvest in 15-inch row plots that were sprayed broadcast with 1× herbicide rate in 1997 only. Weight of beans lost per unit area and trash weight from 7-oz (200-g) bean sample was similar among treatments both years. Overall, weed control, yield, and harvest efficacy of lima bean was not impacted by row spacing, herbicide rate, or method of herbicide application in a commercial production system.

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