Reducing the Pollution Potential of Pesticides and Fertilizers in the Environmental Horticulture Industry: II. Lawn Care and Landscape Management

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  • 1 Horticulture, The Ornamentals Working Group, Georgia Experiment Station, The University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223.
  • 2 Entomology, The Ornamentals Working Group, Georgia Experiment Station, The University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223.
  • 3 Department of Horticulture, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • 4 Plant pathology, The Ornamentals Working Group, Georgia Experiment Station, The University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223.
  • 5 Department of Entomology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • 6 Department of Horticulture, Coastal Plain Experiment Station, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793.
  • 7 Agricultural and applied economics, The Ornamentals Working Group, Georgia Experiment Station, The University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223.
  • 8 Department of Horticulture, Rural Development Center, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793.
  • 9 Department of Entomology, Rural Development Center, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793.

Optimizing growing conditions and, thereby, plant growth reduces the susceptibility of plants to many disease and insect pest problems. Educating lawn or landscape management professionals and homeowners about plant health management reduces the need for chemical intervention. Pesticides combined with N and P fertilizers contribute to water pollution problems in urban areas; thus, it is important to manage the amount, timing, and placement of chemicals and fertilizers. To educate consumers applying pesticides and fertilizers in residential gardens, we must educate the sales representatives and others who interact most closely with consumers. Evidence suggests that knowledge about the effects of chemicals is limited and that warning labels are not read or are ignored. Integrated pest management (IPM) offers alternatives to conventional chemical treatments, but such methods are not used commonly because of their relatively high cost and their uncertain impact on pests. Pest detection methods and using pest-resistant plants in landscapes are simple and, in many cases, readily available approaches to reducing the dependence on chemical use. Research on effective, low-cost IPM methods is essential if chemical use in landscape management is to decrease. Current impediments to reducing the pollution potential of chemicals used in the landscape include the limited number of easily implemented, reliable, and cost-effective alternative pest control methods; underfunding of research on development of alternative pest control measures; limited knowledge of commercial operators, chemical and nursery sales representatives, landscape architects, and the general public concerning available alternatives; reluctance of the nursery industry to produce, and of the landscape architects to specify the use of, pest-resistant plant materials; lack of economic or regulatory incentive for professionals to implement alternatives; inadequate funding for education on the benefits of decreased chemical use; and the necessity of changing consumer definition of unacceptable plant damage. We need to teach homeowners and professionals how to manage irrigation to optimize plant growth; use sound IPM practices for reducing disease, weed, and insect problems; and minimize pollution hazards from fertilizers and pesticides.

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