Soil, Plant, and Canopy Responses To Carbonated Irrigation Water

in HortTechnology
Authors:
Craig A. Storlie Assistant professor and extension specialist in agricultural engineering, Rutgers University, Rutgers Research and Development Center, 121 Northville Road, Bridgeton, NJ 08302.

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Joseph R. Heckman Assistant professor and extension specialist in soil fertility, Rutgers University, Plant Science Department, 167 Foran Hall, P.O. Box 231, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.

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Scientists have sought to stimulate plant growth using carbonated irrigation water for more than 100 years. The mechanisms by which carbonated water may increase plant productivity and the influence of environmental and cultural growing conditions on those mechanisms are not completely understood. Several greenhouse and field studies have demonstrated that carbonated irrigation water can increase crop yield significantly while others have shown that carbonated irrigation water does not influence plant productivity. It is unlikely that carbonated irrigation water will be recommended commercially until the conditions are delineated under which a positive and economically advantageous growth response is ensured.

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